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The  "Turks" of Sumter County, South Carolina

Joseph being called Yusef Ben Ali was first recorded by Thomas Sumter's grandson.

This inspects the orgin of the surname, Benenhaley.

Sue New,  Copyright ©2005, all rights reserved.

Since you've read the history behind the Benenhaley surname, you've read about the character in Don Quixote.  Benengeli, is pronounced exactly as the family in Sumter Co., SC, according to the New International Encyclopedia of Phrase and Fable. The name is presented as a Moor, a Mohammedan, an Arabian and a Manchegan author. That seems to establish that the name Benenhaley is of Arabic origin, and since a large segment of Turkey is Arabic and migrated freely into North Africa, there is some real ground for the Benenhaleys to be called Turks. That was according to a 1943 issue of Baptist Courier called "Long Branch In The Santee," by J.H. Mitchell who served for four years beginning in 1904 as the first pastor of the Turk church, Long Branch Baptist. At any rate, the surname, Benenhaley doesn't pertain to any Indian tribe.

In another document (folder 9 of the papers of McDonald Furman (1863-1904, a historian living in a little town in Sumter County, called Ramsey), on file in the Manuscripts Room of the South Carolinianan Library, Columbia, SC, there is a letter to him dated August 16, 1889, from Sebastian D'Amblemont Sumter (a resident of Stateburg, another little town in Sumter Co, and well known in South Carolina as an American citizen born in Brazil, the youngest son of Thomas Sumter Jr., and his French wife, Natalie de Delage de Volude Sumter). This is the quote:

"Dear Sir, Yours of the 14th instant at hand. I am sorry to say that I can give you no information. my father was one of the Commissioners for the selection of the site for Sumter.You will problem find the desired information in th Clerk's Office at Sumter or in that of the Secretary of State.  You are correct as to his title of Colonel and also as to his being Minister to Brazil." (speaking here again of Thomas Sumter Jr.)   "As to the original Benenhaley, I know nothing having seen him only once or twice in my early boyhood nearly sixty years ago."  (That would be around 1830 when Benenhaley was about 55 years old; I think he died during the first 6 months of 1830.)  "I am very certain that General Sumter had no hand in his importation and do not think that he made his appearance here until after the first decade of the present century." (General Thomas Sumter, 1734-1832, was the father of Thomas Sumter Jr., 1763-1840, and grandfather of Sebastian D'Amblemont Sumter.)  "I think your father or Mrs. Whitaker wrote many years ago in a magazine several articles about the different peoples in that neighborhood, the Benenhaley among the number.

Sincerely, S. Sumter"

Mary Furman Whitaker edited several magazines at one time or another, but finding those articles is another matter.  This was stated by Elizabeth's granddaughter, a daughter of Joseph Benenhaley Jr. named Mary Ann Oxendine, in her 80s in 1928.

The 1820 census for Sumter District, South Carolina (page 109, the 11th name down from the top of the page) names Benenhaleys as a white family of twelve, headed by 'Joseph Benenhali,' who was employed in mnufacturing. He and his wife (Elizabeth Miller Benenhaley) and another woman residing in the same household were all listed as least 45 years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Benenhaley had three sons (Joseph Jr., Francis and Ferdinand, or Lysander, most likely), and six daughters- a son and three daughters from 10-15 years of age, inclusive, and two sons and three daughters younger. A man named James Spann (the 10th name down from the top of the page), lived next door to this family, which reinforces the supposition that the Turks lived at or very near the present sit of the Long Branch Baptist Church at the head of Spann Branch from the very beginning of their residence in Sumter County.The 1830 census for Sumter Co., (page 82, the 7th name from the bottom of the page), found only seven people residing in the household of Joseph Benenhaley, deceased probably no more than a few months before-- "Elizabeth Benenhaley" (in the age bracket marked 36 through 54), three sons (Joseph Benenhaley Jr., Francis Benenhaley and Ferdinand Benenhaley or Lysander Benenhaley), and two daughters from 10 to 23 years of age, and another daughter, younger. The eleventh name from the bottom of the page is that of Thomas Sumter Jr. This is less than a 100 years. This is not General Sumter, but his son.

#1--Benenhaley was not spelled the same in some of the early census.., you've seen that. It took a while for the spelling of Benenhaley to evolve. It was spelled Benenhala in 1840. It did finally stabilize.

#2-Yusef was mentioned earlier than 100 years later. Conclusions about this family cannot be made lightly. I realize we will never have all our questions answered, but we cannot tack Indian blood on them with no proof, whatever. Now, I am not saying anything of the Oxindine lineage, nor the Scott. They could be full blood Indian for all I know, but Joseph Benenhaley was not Indian.


1810 census-a single Benenhaley family of 7.., the family was founded in 1805 (when Joseph and Elizabeth married)

1820-12 Benenhaleys in a single house

1830-7 Benenhaleys in a single house

1840-13 in three houses of Benenheleys

1850-18--15 Benenhaleys and 3 Oxendines in 3 families

1860-30, all named Benenhaley, in 6 families

1870-30 in 6 families-22 Benenhaleys, 6 Oxendines & 2 Rays

1880- 45 in 8 families--33 Benenhaleys, 10 Oxendines and 3 Rays

1928-about 300.., possibly more

A hundred in 1963

1972-500

In 1810 census for Sumter District, SC (page 221 the sixth name down from the top po page) names a Joseph Belenhaly as the head of family of 7.

Stated in this paper "Benengeli seems to have been a native of Turkey and/or Arab decent. (1800 and 1801 is in the margin) In 1810, Joseph and his family were living in a house on the north side of Spann Branch near its source.

Spann Branch flows into Long Branch, a tributary of the Pocotaligo river, which enters the Black River, also called Weenee river; which empties in Winyah Bay and from thence into the Atlantic.

In 1860 census, Sumter District, page 114, number 1008-891 there were Sarah Benenhaile, 40; Henry Benenhaile, 20, a day laborer.

Page 114, house # 1012-895; Jocey Benenhaile, 55, a farmer, wife Katie Benenhaile 46. These two people are Joseph, Jr and wife, Catherine Scott. In the house were William Benenhaile, 25; Thomas Benenhaile, 23; Ellen Benenhaile 22; Jocey Benenhaile 1.

(I won't list the man's acreage, animals, vegetables and so forth, in short , his worth.)

In 1860, counting spouses, there were thirty, all spelled

Benenhaile.., the fiftieth year of their existence in Sumter District; all but two of them living on three adjoining farms with a total acreage of seventy , adn these two living just a couple of houses down the road from the others. Their names appear on pages 114 and 115, but on page 116, there are nine Oxendines, three in the first house and six in the second.


Sue New to Pony Hill on the Benenhaley name: (edited by FOC)

To tell you my own experience with Benenhaley descendants, of which I am one:   I was 17 when my great grandfather (James F. Taylor born 1859), died in 1948. He was the grandson of Leo Cadeo Benenhaley Taylor, daughter of Joseph Benenhaley, who was scout for Thomas Sumter in Rev War. My gr gr grandfather (William J. Taylor, father of James F.), was killed in Civil War 1864. James F. was born in the home of his father's parents (William and Leo Cadeo Benenhaley Taylor), and remained in their house for 5 or 6 years. After his father was killed in war, James' mother had a falling out with her mother in law, Leo Cadeo, and moved out of the house. In 1870, she and her two young sons were living alone in extreme poverty when they could have been supported by her in laws who, while not rich, had plenty. When James F. married in 1877 (he was only 17), he would not introduce his wife to his grandmother but he did his grandfather. This family history was told to me by James Floyd, himself, and his wife, Winnie Harriet Nelson Taylor. James F. Taylor, also told me his grandmother was Turk.  This from her grandson, born in her house, broke ties with her, but way before 1900. James was born 1859, and he was officially offered land in Indian Territory in 1890s, when he lived in TX. He could not be approved simply because he was Turk, not Indian.  He would have been glad to been a recipient of the land grant, and would have, had it been possible.   A man from Turkey visited the Benenhaleys, and was received and honored by the Benenhaleys.

When I visited some of the Benenhaley family in Dalzel a few years ago, they were very hospitable, and seemed to have no doubt they were descended from a Turkish ancestor, Joseph Benenhaley. I know there is no way it can be proven, at this point, but you will understand it is hard for me to discount Joseph's daughter's account of being Turk. My great grandfather had no reason to lie, and he might have been glad to change it to Indian lineage but could not.


Pony Hill to Sue New (and others) on the "Turks" of Sumter County, SC:

First off let me say this, I have no doubt that prior to the Civil War that the community of mixed-blood persons residing in Sumter County were probably referred to as "Turks". That this label was meant to define a Turkish origin for the group, I do not believe. In other areas at the same time, people of the same mixed-blood were called "Portugeuse" and "Moors" yet their ancestors are not from Portugal or the coast of Africa. 'Turk' was used the same way 'Melungeon' was used in Tennessee...not to explain the origin of a people, just to give a label to a mixed-blood community in order to differentiate it from the whites and blacks around them.

That your ancestor referred to himself as a "Turk" when he lived away from Sumter as a way of explaining his dark skin, is no surprise. In his mind, I suppose, it was a way to explain his racial origin, "I'm not full-blooded Indian, I'm not part Black, I'm a Turk from Sumter County" The fact that he applied for Indian land (it was not freely offered, an individual had to apply) but was turned down because he was a 'Turk' (which at the time was known to the Indian Office as mixed-blood persons of Indian descent but of unknown tribal origin-see below-) should be evident that he at least believed he had some Indian blood. However, at the time, persons called 'Turk' in Sumter were very offended by that label. When a class action suit was filed to allow 'Turk' children into white schools it was very clear that "you do not call them Turk to their face", and it was also noted by historians and ethnologists in the 1930's and 1940's that these people would get fighting mad if you called them Turk. I also have no doubt that there are probably people who now proudly claim to be 'Turk', there are people now who proudly claim to be 'Melungeon', but this is now a more racially tolerant South....prior to World War 2, a sure way to get a black eye was to go to Sumter and call someone a 'Turk' or go to Tennessee and call someone a 'Melungeon'.

Before his death in the early 1800's, Joe Benenhaley was the subject of a court case in Sumter where citizens were objecting to his right to vote. Dr. Brewton Berry made note of this incident in his 1940's book "Almost White". Berry notes that Benenhaley was called to testfiy as to his racial origin. (an important note here is that Berry recounts the testimony as that Benenahley was a 'mestizo' but no mention of 'Turk'..Tom Sumter, the General's grandson, also called Benenhaley a "mestizo" in his history book but made no mention of Turkish origin) While Benenhaley was testifying, General Sumter stormed into the Courtroom, walked up to the witness stand and firmly shook Benenhaley's hand. (it was well known in the South at that time that no respectful Southern gentleman would shake a Negroes hand) This was all the judge needed to see, and the case was promptly dismissed.

In the 1930's, a court case was pressed to allow 'Turk' children to attend white schools. Reports from this case reveal that all the children subject to the proceedings (including Benehaley, Scott, Ellison, Tidwell, Deas families) were presently attending a special 'Indian School' and all the grandparents claimed to be "of Indian ancestry".

Here are a few historical references as to the racial origin of the 'Turks':

-"The Croatan Indians comprise a body of mixed-blood people residing chiefly in Robeson County, NC. A few of the same class of people reside in Bladen, Columbus, Cumberland, Scotland, and Hoke Counties, NC, and in Sumter, Marlboro, and Dillon Counties, SC. 1914 letter from special Indian agent O.M. McPherson to Commissioner of Indian Affairs

-"The Croatan tribe lives principally in Robeson County, NC, though there is quite a number of them settled in counties adjoining in North and South Carolina. In Sumter County, SC, there is a branch of the tribe, and also in east Tennessee. Those living in east Tennessee are called "Melungeans", a name also retained by them here, which is a corruption of "Melange", a name given them by early settlers (French), which means mixed." 1888 pamphlet published by Mr. Hamilton McMillan of Fayetteville, NC.

-"At one time the Croatans were known as "Redbones," and there is still a street in Fayetteville so called because some of them once lived on it. They are known by this name in Sumter County, SC, where they are a quiet and peaceable people, and have a church of their own. They are proud and high-spirited, and caste is very strong among them."1891 article of Dr. William T. Harris, Papers American Historical Association.

-It is well known that for the majority of the War, General Sumter camped on the Indian lands which were inhabited by the confederated Cheraw and Catawba tribe. Every able-bodied male Indian of that group was enlisted as scouts and warriors under various captains who served under Sumter's command. Sumter never approached the coast, and there are almost entire libraries of writings about Sumter's campaigns which were written by people who witnessed the battles. I'm sure that if Sumter had a Turkish guide during the War, someone would have noted it (why would Gen. Sumter, a man familiar with the area, retain a 'guide' from Turkey?). The only written record states that Sumter used Indian guides, scouts, spys, and warriors extensively.


(Sent by Sue New in reply to Pony Hill. (Forgive my stubbornness, but we were open minded a long time ago to the Indian theory, and found it is speculation, not realistic.)

I am familiar with all the quotations you give, and they are all someone's speculation. Somehow, it bothers me to say Joseph's own daughter, who called herself and her father Turk, was stupid or ignorant or both. And my great grandfather did not apply for land in Indian Territory on his own. This may be the only case in history, but the Indian Authority came to him and his uncles (Joseph's grandsons, James and Henry), and offered them land, since they had no doubt the men were Indian. They were not, and again, could they have gotten by with some sort of documentation, they would have had the land. It did not cross their minds to apply for land they knew they could not qualify for.

In a letter, written 1917 by Thomas S. Sumter, he tells that Gen. Thomas Sumter was asked to quell a disturbance among the Indians instigated by the French. Which, he stopped by putting the most prominent of the Frenchmen in irons, put them on a ship and sent it to France, never to see or hear of the vessel again. He begin trading with those Indians and acquired from them a plantation near Nelson's Ferry The Rev. War was started just afterward and Gen. Thomas had a following of those friendly Indians and a following of whites who joined in the fight. Just after that he came upon the crowd who were gambling with roosters."It was from this crowd he enlisted 'Yusef Ben Ali (later called Joseph Benenhaley), a Caucasian apparently of Arab descent," and a man named Scott. He made Joseph Benenhaley his scout, in which capacity he continued during the war.There is more to the letter, which original was in the hands of Mrs. Beatrice Benenhaley Hood. This letter was most likely published in a book by Sumter's grandson. Also, Sumter's grandson said his grandfather found "Yusef Ben Ali (later called Joseph Benenhaley), a Caucasian apparently of Arab descent." I admit no one can be totally certain of the blood line of the Benenhaleys, but be sure they were not Indian, although it would not matter to me if they were. Neither were they of African descent, although, again, it would not matter to me if they were. I have no ax to grind, neither am I prejudiced against, nor partial to a blood line, but it is very difficult for me to ignore history which comes straight from Joseph via his daughter. His daughter married William Taylor and they had 7 children in SC, but relocated to GA before 1850, where the last three children were born. I have a photo of 4 of the daughters. I am not convinced Ann Gregorie's account is absolute truth nor do I take for truth these Johnnies come lately who are talking about so called Melungeons, a somewhat new title on the horizon as explanation of certain mixed blood people. That doesn't have a thing to do with the Benenhaley lineage. Please know I am not against anyone being Melungeon or finding their roots regardless. I am for genealogy, for anyone doing all they can in learning about their past, so I didn't intend to sound critical or judgemental concerning Melungeons and their descendants or their reseachers. (I added the words beginning with "Please," from the original letter I sent to Pony Hill. I, too, have studied the works of a couple researcher concerning Melungeon lineage and respect all of it).

In 1963, it is documented that Muhittin Guven, a Turkish member of Parliament, came to this country on an official tour. His interpreter for the visits, having heard of the community of Turks, placed Sumter on the itinerary of the distinguished guest. While the press did dominate the visit, he did have a short stay with Julius Benenhaley, the 'king of the clan.' Julius was not king but the oldest of the community. Again, at this point, it is unlikely that one Benenhaley descendant can lay hand to Bible and swear he is Turk (I can't and I am a 7th generation descendant), but that word from General Sumter and from Joseph, himself through his children, is about all they have and I tend to trust that research more than all the speculation. If you have an ancestor who left a Bible record, letter or other document, or even verbal history, stating they are not Turk, that would go a long way in convincing me that Joseph Benenhaley's daughter was mistaken, and that her son and grandson were mistaken. All I am interested in is the truth. Not someone saying, "because of this and that, it seems logical it had to be "this.' In researching my own genealogy, I have learned that assumption and "logic" is a long way from truth.
Joseph Benenhaley & Elizabeth Miller
Leo Cadeo Benenhaley Taylor
William J. Taylor
James F. Taylor
Vaylor Taylor Taylor (she married a Taylor)
Estelle Taylor Dopson
Sue Dopson New

Thank you so much for discussing this with me. I have been in touch with a good number of descendants who are as sincerely interested as I am, and we have been sharing lineage. I truly desire the truth and not building on "must be" or maybes. I am sure you feel the same. Sue  4/28/2005


1810 census-a single Benenhaley family of 7.., the family was founded in 1805 (when Joseph and Elizabeth married)

1820-12 Benenhaleys in a single house

1830-7 Benenhaleys in a single house

1840-13 in three houses of Benenheleys

1850-18--15 Benenhaleys and 3 Oxendines in 3 families

1860-30, all named Benenhaley, in 6 families

1870-30 in 6 families-22 Benenhaleys, 6 Oxendines & 2 Rays

1880- 45 in 8 families--33 Benenhaleys, 10 Oxendines and 3 Rays

1928-about 300.., possibly more

1963 there were a hundred Benenhaley families

1972- there were 500

In 1810 census for Sumter District, SC (page 221 the sixth name down from the top po page) names a Joseph Belenhaly as the head of family of 7.

Stated in this paper "Benengeli seems to have been a native of Turkey and/or Arab decent. (1800 and 1801 is in the margin) In 1810, Joseph and his family were living in a house on the north side of Spann Branch near its source.

Spann Branch flows into Long Branch, a tributary of the Pocotaligo river, which enters the Black River, also called Weenee river; which empties in Winyah Bay and from thence into the Atlantic.


4/29/2005

Joseph being called Yusef Ben Ali was first recorded by Thomas Sumter's grandson.

This inspects the orgin of the surname, Benenhaley.

Since you've read the history behind the Benenhaley surname, you've read about the character in Don Quixote

Benengeli, is pronounced exactly as the family in Sumter Co., SC, according to the New International Encyclopedia of Phrase and Fable. The name is presented as a Moor, a Mohammedan, an Arabian and a Manchegan author. That seems to establish that the name Benenhaley is of Arabic origin, and since a large segment of Turkey is Arabic and migrated freely into North Africa, there is some real ground for the Benenhaleys to be called Turks. That was according to a 1943 issue of Baptist Courier called "Long Branch In The Santee," by J.H. Mitchell who served for four years beginning in 1904 as the first pastor of the Turk church, Long Branch Baptist. At any rate, the surname, Benenhaley doesn't pertain to any Indian tribe.

In another document (folder 9 of the papers of McDonald Furman (1863-1904, a historian living in a little town in Sumter County, called Ramsey), on file in the Manuscripts Room of the South Carolinianan Library, Columbia, SC, there is a letter to him dated August 16, 1889, from Sebastian D'Amblemont Sumter (a resident of Stateburg, another little town in Sumter Co, and well known in South Carolina as an American citizen born in Brazil, the youngest son of Thomas Sumter Jr., and his French wife, Natalie de Delage de Volude Sumter). This is the quote:

"Dear Sir, Yours of the 14th instant at hand. I am sorry to say that I can give you no information. my father was one of

the Commissioners for the selection of the site for Sumter.You will problem find the desired information in th Clerk's Office at Sumter or in that of the Secretary of State.

You are correct as to his title of Colonel and also as to his being Minister to Brazil." (speaking here again of Thomas Sumter Jr.)

"As to the original Benenhaley, I know nothing having seen him only once or twice in my early boyhood nearly sixty years ago."

(That would be around 1830 when Benenhaley was about 55 years old; I think he died during the first 6 months of 1830.)

"I am very certain that General Sumter had no hand in his

importation and do not think that he made his appearance here until after the first decade of the present century." (General Thomas Sumter, 1734-1832, was the father of Thomas Sumter Jr., 1763-1840, and grandfather of Sebastian D'Amblemont Sumter.)

"I think your father or Mrs. Whitaker wrote many years ago in a magazine several articles about the different peoples in that neighborhood, the Benenhaley among the number.

Sincerely, S. Sumter"

Mary Furman Whitaker edited several magazines at one time or another, but finding those articles is another matter.

This was stated by Elizabeth's granddaughter, a daughter of Joseph Benenhaley Jr. named Mary Ann Oxendine, in her 80s in 1928.

The 1820 census for Sumter District, South Carolina (page 109, the 11th name down from the top of the page) names Benenhaleys as a white family of twelve, headed by 'Joseph Benenhali,' who was employed in mnufacturing. He and his wife (Elizabeth Miller Benenhaley) and another woman residing in the same household were all listed as least 45 years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Benenhaley had three sons (Joseph Jr., Francis and Ferdinand, or Lysander, most likely), and six daughters- a son and three daughters from 10-15 years of age, inclusive, and two sons and three daughters younger. A man named James Spann (the 10th name down from the top of the page), lived next door to this family, which reinforces the supposition that the Turks lived at or very near the present sit of the Long Branch Baptist Church at the head of Spann Branch from the very beginning of their residence in Sumter County.The 1830 census for Sumter Co., (page 82, the 7th name from the bottom of the page), found only seven people residing in the household of Joseph Benenhaley, deceased probably no more than a few months before-- "Elizabeth Benenhaley" (in the age bracket marked 36 through 54), three sons (Joseph

Benenhaley Jr., Francis Benenhaley and Ferdinand Benenhaley or Lysander Benenhaley), and two daughters from 10 to 23 years of age, and another daughter, younger. The eleventh name from the bottom of the page is that of Thomas Sumter Jr. This is less than a 100 years. This is not General Sumter, but his son.

#1--Benenhaley was not spelled the same in some of the early census.., you've seen that. It took a while for the spelling of Benenhaley to evolve. It was spelled Benenhala in 1840. It did finally stabilize.

#2-Yusef was mentioned earlier than 100 years later. Conclusions about this family cannot be made lightly. I realize we will never have all our questions answered, but we cannot tack Indian blood on them with no proof, whatever. Now, I am not saying anything of the Oxindine lineage, nor the Scott. They could be full blood Indian for all I know, but Joseph Benenhaley was not Indian.


In 1860 census, Sumter District, page 114, number 1008-891 there were Sarah Benenhaile, 40; Henry Benenhaile, 20, a day laborer.

Page 114, house # 1012-895; Jocey Benenhaile, 55, a farmer, wife Katie Benenhaile 46. These two people are Joseph, Jr and wife, Catherine Scott. In the house were William Benenhaile, 25; Thomas Benenhaile, 23; Ellen Benenhaile 22; Jocey Benenhaile 1.

(I won't list the man's acreage, animals, vegetables and so forth, in short , his worth.)

In 1860, counting spouses, there were thirty, all spelled

Benenhaile.., the fiftieth year of their existence in Sumter District; all but two of them living on three adjoining farms with a total acreage of seventy , adn these two living just a couple of houses down the road from the others. Their names appear on pages 114 and 115, but on page 116, there are nine Oxendines, three in the first house and six in the second.


these, also, are facinating documents...i find it strange however that one Sumter in the late 1880's would state that he knew little of the origin of Benenhaley, and yet another Sumter later in the early 1910's would be able to give a full account...hmmmm.

The Mitchell's and the Spann's were also from the Halifax district area, border of NC/VA..these documents would bolster the belief that these families moved down into Sumter as a group just after 1810....It is certain (from these letters) that Benehaley was most probably not a guide or scout for Sumter, as is often retold.

If ,indeed, Benenhaley was of Arabic descent, that still does not nulify the fact that some of his children intermarried with other families in the community who were of Indian descent, and generations later, the people in Sumter were all looked apon as persons of Indian descent, with an Indian school, and an Indian church.....I guess the statement should read like this "The Turks of Sumter County are, by majority, of Indian descent, however there are some lineages which most likely are of Arabic descent." PONY (Hill)


4/29/2005

1810 census-a single Benenhaley family of 7.., the family was founded in 1805 (when Joseph and Elizabeth married)

1820-12 Benenhaleys in a single house

1830-7 Benenhaleys in a single house

1840-13 in three houses of Benenheleys

1850-18--15 Benenhaleys and 3 Oxendines in 3 families

1860-30, all named Benenhaley, in 6 families

1870-30 in 6 families-22 Benenhaleys, 6 Oxendines & 2 Rays

1880- 45 in 8 families--33 Benenhaleys, 10 Oxendines and 3 Rays

1928-about 300.., possibly more

A hundred in 1963

1972-500

In 1810 census for Sumter District, SC (page 221 the sixth name down from the top po page) names a Joseph Belenhaly as the head of family of 7.

Stated in this paper "Benengeli seems to have been a native of Turkey and/or Arab decent. (1800 and 1801 is in the margin) In 1810, Joseph and his family were living in a house on the north side of Spann Branch near its source.

Spann Branch flows into Long Branch, a tributary of the Pocotaligo river, which enters the Black River, also called Weenee river; which empties in Winyah Bay and from thence into the Atlantic.


In responding to Bettye concerning census spelling of Leo Cadeo (Locadia is one census version.., Leah is another), my verification of her name is in her grandson's Bible as well as his verbal pronunciation. Leo was born 1809 to Joseph and Elizabeth Miller Benenhaley. She was married to William M. Taylor. They had 11 children. Her son, William J. Taylor was born 1836 and killled in Civil War 1864. He left two sons, one of which was my great grandfather, born 1859. He was born in his grandmother's house. Leo died in 1898, when my great grandfather was 38 years of age. She is the one who told him he was Turk. He died in 1948 when I was 18. He told us he was Turk.

Sue New

Copyright ©2005, Sue New, all rights reserved.

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This page is Copyright ©2005, Sue New, all rights reserved, and Pony Hill's comments are Copyright ©2005, Pony Hill, all rights reserved.  This document may not be sold, nor given to anyone who may attempt to derive profit from same.  It may be used in your family history or genealogy, for which purpose it was intended.