Below submitted by Ed Gill

Descendants of George GILL

Generation No. 1

1. SR. GEORGE2 GILL (THOMAS1 GILL?) was born 1730 in Probably Lurgan, Armagh Co., N. Ireland, and died June 13, 1795 in Chester Co., SO Carolina. He married (1) ELEANOR OR SUSANNAH KELSEY (?) Abt. 1760. She was born Abt. 1740 in County Armagh, Northern Ireland, and died Abt. 1770 in Probably South Carolina. He married (2) MARY LEWIS (?) Abt. 1772 in Probably South Carolina, daughter of ??? LEWIS and UNKNOWN. She was born 1745, and died December 15, 1825 in near-by Madisonville, Hopkins Co., Ky..

Notes for SR. GEORGE GILL:

George GILL Sr., was born 1730 near Lurgan, County Armagh, Northern Ireland (Ulster). Records indicate that George Sr., first married Eleanor KELSEY??)

George Gill was first listed in Drumore Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in 1759 as a renter of a room or house belonging to a weaver, Samuel Dickson. In 1763 records show he was married and taxed on his occupation. Robert, his brother, was listed on the tax rolls of adjacent Martic Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, starting in 1754. Brother John was listed as a resident of Gloucester County, New Jersey, in 1742. William, James and Thomas could also have been their brothers.

George and Eleanor probably came to America (1753-1765)--maybe in the fourth wave of the Great Migration 1753-54. At least four children were born to this union. Eleanor probably died c1771 and George, Sr., married Mary Lewis c1773 in SC.

George Sr., migrated to present Chester Co., SC before April 1768, and settled land on Gum Log Branch of the South Fork Fishing Creek that he bought from Robert and Mary Morris. He followed the trade of clockmaker and silversmith. It is possible that the Gill brothers chose that area because other relatives had preceded them. A Thomas Gill had obtained a grant from King George II in 1755 near Waxhaw Settlement ............................ and a James Gill (both possible brothers) had claimed a grant of 350 acres near the Congaree River in 1749 (DBk 4 p499). Soon all the Gill emigrants found available land near one another. In 1767 Robert claimed 300 acres (Vol 8 p404), Thomas was granted 150 acres and John received 500 acres near Fishing Creek (Vol 11 p453). George paid 172 pounds and 10 shillings for his 200 acres (Vol 3 p74), and James Gill bought 200 acres bordering George on the east in December of that year (Vol 8 p537).

The Gills had been granted land which lay in a disputed area between the Carolinas. None of the land between the provinces had been surveyed west of the Catawba River, and grants overlapped from both. Gill lands designated as in Craven, Camden, Anson, Mecklinburg, and Tryon were actually the same locations in what is now Chester Co., SC.

The transaction which George had made for his acreage was proven in the spring session of court, 1768, and recorded as, "...a plantation or tract of land containing 200 acres, situated as supposed to be when run out to be in Mecklinburg Co., in the Province of N. Carolina, on the S. fork of Fishing Creek a little above the forks, joining and between Brown's and John Davis lines...Robert Brown's corner..near Edward Croft's line...originally granted 25 April 1767 by North Carolina to Robert Morris and conveyed by him and his wife Mary to the memoralist by deed of release 4 April 1768."

The Gills continued to buy and sell land. On Sept. 2, 1774, George signed as a witness when John and Sarah Gill sold some of their land on the South Fork of Fishing Creek to Christopher Strait. By this time John, Robert and James Gill and their children were busy farming and carrying on their trades to the east of George in Chester Co. All but George was recorded as being supportive, along with their neighbors, in forming the Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church in the early 1770s. (It is possible that George may have become a widower during this period and then married Mary Lewis). Their pastor, Rev. John Simpson, arrived from New Jersey and made pastoral visits in 1774 and 75 to the church communicants, which he meticulously recorded. These Gill brothers were all listed in his accounts. James and Mary Gill, neighbors to Robert, had at least five children, all born and living at home before 1774 (according to the Fishing Creek pastoral records): Mary, Rosanna, Catharine, James and Thomas.

Shocking word spread in 1775 from the New England Colonies: on April 19th Captain John Parker and 77 Minutemen had stood ground against British troops at Lexington, Mass., and "fired the shot heard around the world". Tension mounted in the countryside.. Amid this tension, Mary Gill felt the first pangs of labor in her lower back. Hours later, on July 13, 1775, George Gill heard the wails of his newly born son. Mary and George named him George Jr.

When the baby was just a few months old, on December 13, 1775, "George Gill, silversmith," bought 300 more acres from James Hannah for 380 pounds currant money of South Carolina. The land lay only a couple of miles to the south and they moved their little family into the larger house on that land.

Just a few months later, on April 23, 1776, a George Gill and Archibald Gill (Mad Archie, son of Robert), enlisted in the 6th Regiment. Robert and John were too old for battle, but their sons were encouraged to fight. Robert's son George had already joined the 1st Regiment in 1775. "Col" George Gill, who had convinced his father, John, that at age 18 he was finally old enough to engage in battle, enlisted in 1779, at the same time that his cousin Archy re-enlisted. Thomas, Robert Jr., John and James also enlisted.

Early on the Sabbath, June 11, the Fishing Creek Presbyterian log church house stood quietly in the summer heat. Loyalist soldiers under Capt.Christian Huck, who had a great dislike of Presbyterians, quietly approached the building but found only one young man, William Strong, silently reading his Scottish Bible inside. With one shot through an open window, a marksman killed William in the house of worship. Huck's fury drove him from the meeting house. He plundered and destroyed Col. William Hill's Iron Works, then ordered the home and library of Reverend Simpson put to the torch. As flames consumed the cabin, Mrs. Simpson and her children hid in the woods.

This violent act "...ignited the torch of freedom that flamed in the breast of the minister and his congregation. Simpson's Fishing Creek church became the rallying point of patriot resistance". Scarcely two weeks later, on June 25, 1780, George Gill Sr., enlisted as a "Horseman" in the South Carolina Militia under Captain William Tate, providing his own horse and musket. He stood ready to defend Carolinian civil liberties and the freedom of religion and joined General Thomas Sumter's partisan army.

In August of 1780 Lord Cornwallis marched into the interior along the Wateree River and encountered Horatio Gates and 3000 rebels at Camden, SC which was only 45 miles from the Gill homes. The armies faced one another in open forest with swamps at both sides.. Within hours General Gates found his forces outflanked, and he fled the field, leaving his troops to follow the best they could to headquarters at Charlotte, NC. Several hundred patriots died that day, and hundreds more were captured.

George Sr. was rounded up with other prisoners, and force-marched south to the British headquaters at Camden, while his horse carried a British oldier.

Robert Jr. also lost his horse that day, and was taken prisoner at Black River a short time later, as he was trying to deliver swords which he had made for General Sumter. He was also imprisoned at Camden.

As the weeks went by George Gill Sr. was moved to the two-storied jail with its compound in the village of Camden. Dysentery, infection, and smallpox plagued the prisoners. Some were shackled to the floor or wall. As fall gave way to winter, icy winds howled through the high barred windows and chilled George to the bone. For over four months he languished in the crude prison. Finally on December 30th he was released, perhaps in a prisoner exchange, another of which occurred the following April when young Andrew Jackson was released from the same jail. The sweet air of freedom gave George the needed energy to walk the fifty miles home through the frozen countryside.

A week later, on Jan. 6, 1781, George Sr. was discharged from General Sumter's militia, having served 189 days. By that following October, Lord Cornwallis was defeated and surrendered to the Americans at Yorktown..

During the next several years George and Mary's family continued to enlarge. They also expanded their house and their farm activity. George, like most clockmakers, performed many services which were loosely allied. He was a silversmith, owning nine lots of silversmith tools and some spoon molds. Of course he could also make knee buckle anchors and shoebuckles. He was a highly regarded citizen and was designated as Commissioner of The High Roads of the new county of Chester. While serving in that position the court appointed him in 1786 as one of the five gentlemen who would make a division of road laborers, if any difficulty arose. The previous year he had refused an appointment as Coroner. On Jan. 8, 1790, George and three other justices set rates on liquors to be paid in several taverns that year. One year before George served as a representative from Craven District in the Eighth General Assembly of the House of Representatives, Provincial Congress in Charleston.

By the early 1790's George and Mary Gill were attending Purity Meeting House, which was first organized in 1770 as a Presbyterian Church named Bull Run, and was located on the upper reaches of Rocky Creek, It was located approximately eight miles south from the Gill's land on Rocky Creek, accessible by way of the Saluda and Thompson's Roads, which ran near George's home. Perhaps they attended there since its beginning.

After their pastor left in 1780, and during the next five years, the church became disorganized, due to the chaos and changes in the community after the Revolution. "They remained vacant a considerable time, and the congregation of Purity was almost dissolved by the troubles of the times" (History of Purity Presbyterian Church, p 23). Supply pastors were furnished by the Presbytery until 1794, when Rev. Robert McCulloch was called, whom some said taught Andrew Jackson before moving.

Communicants who did not live by the strict moral code of the church were brought before the congregation for chastisement. At a Sessions meeting in 1792, Purity Church brought a query to that larger governing body. "What shall be done in the case of John Weir and his wife who apply for baptism to their child born within the time limited after marriage?" It was judged that "they be suspended until they make public acknowledgements and be publicly rebuked" (Ibid, p. 26). The first elder of Purity Church, like George Gill, also read books by Doddridge and Boston, according to his estate papers.

Around the countryside, two Gill's were particularly well known. Archibald, called "Mad Archy" after the Revolution, had much influence and high character in the community. He amassed a small fortune, owning sawmills, plantations, a "cotton machine," and the celebrated fishery at Catawba Falls. His cousin, "Col." George Gill, was often called upon to witness various legal transactions. Later, a post office was also established for a time at "Col." George Gill's home.

George Gill Sr. had grown into his autumn years. He was a fairly prosperous yeoman planter, a respected clockmaker and Christian and could look back upon a life where... "he could awake in the morning, consider that new day as his last, and live accordingly."

On June 13, 1795 death came to George Gill Sr. It is not known whether he died as a result of an accident, or of disease. He had lived the good life.

(The above is a condensation from Twyla Gill Wright's "LATCHSTRINGS".)

For more information see "LATCHSTRINGS" BY TWYLA GILL WRIGHT OF BATESVILLE, AR

******************

More About SR. GEORGE GILL:

Baptism: Lurgan, County Armagh, Northern Ireland

Burial: Purity Pbsy. Churchyard. Chester Co., SC, Rev. Robt. McCulloch officiating.

Education: Probably self educated and learned the clackmake and silversmith trade as an apprentice

Elected: 1787, George was appointed to be Justice of Chester County Court of Common Pleas by the House of Representatives

Military service: June 25, 1780, enlisted as a "Horseman" in SC Militia under Capt. William TATE

Occupation: May 28, 1787, George was appointed to be a justice of Chester Co. Court of Common Pleas by the House of Representatives

Notes for ELEANOR OR SUSANNAH KELSEY (?):

Name Eleanor (WGGILLSR)

Sex: F

Born County Armagh, Northern Ireland

Baptized

Died 000-00-1771(2) Probably South Carolina

Buried

Other

Ref 874

Occupation

Husband: George GILL Sr.

More About ELEANOR OR SUSANNAH KELSEY (?):

Src: Dr. Frank O. Clark

More About GEORGE GILL and ELEANOR (?):

Marriage: Abt. 1760

Notes for MARY LEWIS (?):

Mary cane to Kentucky in early 1800s with her family from South Carolina.

One day in 1810 Mary Gill may have stood at her table near the hearth, replacing the lid on the earthen jar which held her sourdough starter. She covered the wooden bowl of wheatbread dough with a cotton cloth and set it aside to rise. From the window, she looked out as the dog barked at an approaching stranger on horseback. Lifting her long white apron, she wiped her hands and the perspiration from her forehead. The census taker. Well remembered scenes from the last time one had visited her in faraway SC, surfaced. Much had happened to her family since then. In her mind she recounted her children. Abraham and Isaac and their families were still in SC, and since there was no post office in area, news from there was rare. Joseph (Josephus) was single and a great help to her, even though he was developing his own land. Her daughter Mary had just married the deputy surveyor, Eli Bishop, on Feb. 27, 1809, with the Rev. John Bourland officiating. The young couple was happily making a home on the Hopkins County acreage. Hannah had married an enterprising young farmer named Richard S. Graham, who seemed to understand legal matters unusually well.

Of course George and Jane had a growing family, and a fairly established farm just north of her near Wiers Creek. William and his wife Mary Anne lived next door to her, having been granted title to their 91 acres on Clear Creek on July 18th of that year. Their children were a blessing. How she enjoyed their two little boys, not yet 10 years old and the little girl. Living alone in the 65th year of her life, but with the help of her slaves, Mary managed her 200 acres and house well, using all the knowledge life had given her. She invited the tired census recorder to pull up a chair on her porch and "take a little refreshment."

The years 1810-1811, brought many changes to the Gill family. George and William were eager to explore new land, and within months had moved away from Hopkins County to new territory in Indiana. Settlers in Indiana and Kentucky got together with their neighbors and talked of the renewed tension between Britain and America. New British rifles had been found in the Indian camps of the territory and the growing confederation of Indian tribes under the Shawnee leadership of Tecumseh and the Prophet was a dangerous threat to the area. General William Henry Harrison was governor of the Indiana Territory, which included present Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, part of Minnesota and Indiana, and under his command an army set out to defeat the Indians at the Battle of Tippecanoe. Two hours after the first shot was fired on that Thursday morning, Nov. 7, 1811, the battle ended.

The New Madrid earthquake sent its first mighty tremor through Hopkins Co. at 2 A.M., Dec. 16, 1811.

On Nov. 25, 1814 George, Jr., accompanied his mother, Mary and his brother-in-law Richard Graham, to the country courthouse. There Mary signed over a power of attorney to Joseph (Josephus) to take with him on a trip back to South Carolina: "I, Mary Gill of the county of Hopkins and State of Kentucky for divers and good causes, me thereunto moving, have ordained, constituted, and appointed...my son Joseph Gill of said County and State, my true and lawful attorney for me and in my name to ask for and demand and receive any money or other things which may be due or owing to me...and I empower him to convey to the person entitled a certain tract of land situated in Chester District in the State of South Carolina, on Rockey Creek, by deed."

George Gill and Richard Graham signed as witnesses.

Soon after she signed the document, Mary packed a good supply of provisions for Joseph to take with him on the long ride back to their former home. His older brother George, who continued to give him his wandering nature, was to accompany him on his trip. They rode away, excited about once again seeing scenes from their childhood, and visiting their brother. Upon arrival in Chester County they must have stayed with Abraham and Agnes, and enjoyed seeing many cousins.

By March 30th Joseph had bargained with and sold to William Stringfellow his own inherited tract, and his mother's. "..For the sum of $720 paid by William Stringfellow..a tract of land containing 180 acres situated on the waters of Rocky Creek in the District of Chester...and laid off as the said Mary Gill's tract of land belonging to the estate of her husband George Gill, deceased." His own tract was described as, "..that parcel of land situated on Rockey Creek in the District of Chester which was allotted or given to me, as my part of the land belonging to my father George Gill, deceased." He sold his 60 acres for $220. Joseph's nephew, Abraham's son Robert Walker Gill, who was a respected school teacher, signed as witness to the transaction, along with Thomas McLure.

After a long trip back to Kentucky, Joseph presented his mother with money from the sale of her property, and probably delighted her with the news of her son's family and that of all the friends and neighbors whom she had enjoyed during the 30 years she had made her home there. But late that fall the Gill's received the sad news of Abraham and Agnes' deaths in South Carolina.

Early in December 1818 Mary Gill smoothed back her grey hair into a high bun on top of her head, and looked at herself in the "looking glass" which hung from a strap on her wall. At 74 years of age she was still in fair health, but her lands were too much for her anymore, even with the help of her slaves Peter and Hetty. She has decided to sell her land and turn over her business matters to her trusted son-in-law Richard Graham.

On Dec. 12, 1818 she sold her 200 acres on Clear Creek to Richard Graham for $450. Joseph and Martha signed as witnesses. A week later she officially gave Richard her power of attorney to handle her business:

'Know all men by these presents that I, Mary Gill of Hopkins Co., State of Kentucky, have constituted and appointed my friend Richard Graham of said County and State, my true and lawful Attorney for me and, in my name to dispose of such of my property as shall be mentioned in the following manner: (to wit) My said Attorney shall apply for and receive all monies that may be due to me by notes or otherwise in the State of Kentucky, he shall sell all my hogs and cattle, as he shall think proper and, for me, receive the monies arising therefrom, he shall to whom he thinks proper, my Negro boy, Peter, at a price he, my said Attorney, shall think his value, the said boy to be hired yearly and for me, receive the money's arising therefrom.

All the money due to me from my said Attorney by notes, or otherwise, to remain in his hands for me; he shall pay out of said monies when collected, to my son, George Gill, the sum of $250, which sum shall be made up by including the monies heretofore received from me by the said George Gill. To my son, WILLIAM, the sum of $250, which sum shall be made by including the monies heretofore received from me by the said WILLIAM GILL; to my son Isaac Gill, the sum of $250. To my son Joseph Gill, the sum of $250. which sum shall be made by including the monies heretofore received from me by the said Joseph Gill.

To the lawful heirs of my deceased daughter, Mary Bishop, the sum of $250. To my daughter, Hannah Graham and Richard S. Graham the sum of $250, which sum shall be made by including the monies heretofore received from me by the said Hannah Graham and Richard S. Graham, said monies is to be paid to the said named persons by my said Attorney when applied for, if my said Attorney has the money appropriated for said purposes in his possession, my said Attorney shall receive from the above named."

Joseph and Martha B. Gill witnessed.

The years that followed were lonely for Mary. George and Jane were in Missouri Territory; William and Mary Anne were in Indiana; Joseph and Martha were in Howard Co., Missouri Territory; her daughter Mary Bishop had died; and Isaac and Ann Caroline were still in SC. She probably turned even more to her daughter Hannah, for they had always been close.

What a joy it must have been that day in 1819, or early 1820, when a wagon approached her house. It was Isaac and Ann Caroline and their children. It had been over 15 years since she had seen them!!!

The next few years saw Mary grow increasingly feeble, but well cared for by her slave Hetty, and daughter Hannah. Isaac probably made frequent trips out to the farmhouse of his mother. On December 15th, 1825 while winter winds moaned around the log house, and a fire burned on the hearth, Mary Gill's long life flickered and went out. An era had ended, the last of a generation was gone. She was buried in what is now Rose Creek Cemetery.

Above condensed from Twyla Gill Wright's "LATCHSTRINGS"

Early York District, So. Carolina Deeds--GILL Book G, Page 538, No. 877, 11 May 1813

Grantor: John GILL & Hanna GILL, his wife of the one part, both at Chester District and Mary GILL of York District of the other part, whereas the said John GILL by his bond or obligation bearing equal date with these presents stands bounds to the said Mary GILL her heirs.......in the sum of one hundred and forty dollars with a condition thereunder written for the payment of seventy dollars for legal interest for the same on or before the first day of October next insuring the date hereof...that for the better securing the said sum of seventy dollars...doth grant or sell unto said Mary GILL all that tract... of land...in York District on the waters of Fishing Creek, Beginning at a maple David Jackson corner thence...on Samuel CURRY'S corner, thence....with S. CURRY and Jane McWHORTER line....containing 102 acres....If the said John GILL & Hanna GILL....shall well and truly pay....Mary GILL...the full sum of seventy dollars....everything herein...shall be void....

In the presence of :

Francis CURRY /s/ John GILL (his mark)

Thomas W. GILL Hannah GILL (her mark)

************

Ed, I thought that you might find this of interest. In a book, that I found in the Seattle Public Library, entitled "North Carolina Land Grants in South Carolina, Vol. II Anson and Mecklenburg Counties 1749 - 1770" by Brent Holcomb, 1975, there was a map on page 89 of the Fishing Creek area. It was an old survey map showing land ownerships.

The map was entitled "Early Surveys on Headwaters of Fishing Creek in York and Chester Counties South Carolina". In Chester County along the "Road >From Turkey Creek to Land's Ford" were the following names of property owners:

James Gill 1769,

Robert Gill 1770,

James Gill 1809,

and nearby on the "South Fork Fishing Creek and Stamp Branch", the Saluda Road runs through the property of:

Robert Gill 1710

It was not really clear but I assume that the dates refer to the year that the Land Grant was given. If you would like a copy of the map I could copy it and send it on to you

Regards; Gary Shirley

****

More About SR. GEORGE GILL:

Baptism: Lurgan, County Armagh, Northern Ireland

Burial: Purity Pbsy. Churchyard. Chester Co., SC, Rev. Robt. McCulloch officiating.

Education: Probably self educated and learned the clackmake and silversmith trade as an apprentice

Notes for ELEANOR OR SUSANNAH KELSEY (?):

Name Eleanor (WGGILLSR)

Sex: F

Born County Armagh, Northern Ireland

Baptized

Died 000-00-1771(2) Probably South Carolina

Buried

Other

Ref 874

Occupation

Husband: George GILL Sr.

More About ELEANOR OR SUSANNAH KELSEY (?):

Src: Dr. Frank O. Clark

More About GEORGE GILL and ELEANOR (?):

Marriage: Abt. 1760

Children of GEORGE GILL and ELEANOR (?) are:

2. i. THOMAS3 GILL, b. 1762, PA; d. December 16, 1839, York Co., SC. m.Rebecca CURRY

3. ii. ABRAHAM GILL, b. 1765, Probably PA.; d. August 20, 1815, Chester Co., S.C.. m. Agnes WALKER

4. iii. JOHN GILL, b. 1767; d. Abt. 1819, Probably York Co., SC., m. Hanna CURRY

iv. JOSIAH GILL, b. 1769; m. UMKNOWN.

More About GEORGE GILL and MARY (?):

Marriage: Abt. 1772, Probably South Carolina

More About MARY LEWIS (?):

Burial: Rose Creek Cem., Hopkins Co., Ky.

Children of GEORGE GILL and MARY (?) are:

5. v. MARY3 GILL, b. 1774, Chester Co., SO Carolina; d. 1818, Hopkins Co., KY., m. Eli BISHOP.

6. vi. JR. GEORGE GILL, b. July 13, 1775, Chester Co., SO Carolina; d. March 11, 1848, Independence Co. AR.. m. Jane CARTER

7. vii. WILLIAM GILL, b. September 14, 1777, Chester Co., S. Carolina; d. July 15, 1844, Sullivan Co., Ind. 66 years, 10 months, 1 day., m. Mar Anne McREYNOLDS.

8. viii. ISAAC NEWTON GILL, b. 1780, Chester Co., SO Carolina; d. 1834, Henderson Co., KY., m. Ann Caroline Switzer EVANS

9. ix. HANNAH GILL, b. 1785, Chester Co., SO Carolina; d. Bef. March 1863, Hopkins Co., KY., Richard S. GRAHAM.

10. x. JOSEPHUS (JOSEPH) GILL, b. October 31, 1789, Chester Co., SO Carolina; d. March 09, 1855, Benton Co., MO., m. Martha BROWDER

Generation No. 2

2. THOMAS3 GILL (GEORGE2, THOMAS1 GILL?) was born 1762 in PA, and died December 16, 1839 in York Co., SC. He married REBECCA CURRY June 27, 1793 in York Co., SC, daughter of SAMUEL CURRY and JANE CARSON. She was born 1769 in VA, and died Aft. 1850 in Probably Buncombe Co., NC.

Notes for THOMAS GILL:

THE BULLETIN-CHESTER DISTRICT GENEELOGICAL SOCIETY, JUNE '91

State of South Carolina, York District

On the 31st day of December 1843 personally appeared before John M. ROSS, Judge of the Court of Ordinary for the District of York, REBECCA GILL, a resi-dent of York District in the State of South Carolina aged seventy-four years,

who being first duly sworn, according to law, doth on her oath, make the

FOC ::

Thomas GILL #W3-978 was born in 1762 in Pennsylvania. Served as a private in the Revolution under Capt. James GILL and also under Capt. John MILLS. He died Dec. 16, 1839 in York Co., SC. His pension was allowed. He wed June 27, 1793 to Rebecca CURRY who in 1843 gave her age as 73 years. She was a resident of Buncombe Co., NC in 1856 and stated she had removed there in 1846. Names of children not given. Was Rebekah CURRY originally from Bunscombe Co., NC and does this provide a clue to the origin of this Thomas GILL??

Thomas Gill (1762 PA - 1843 SC) and Rebekah Curry (c1769 VA-c1851 NC). Thomas Gill, US National Archives Revolutionary War Pension Application #W3-978, was born in 1762 in Pennsylvania. He served as a private in the Revolution under Capt. James Gill and also under Capt. John Mills. He died 16 Dec. 1839 in York Co., SC. His revolutionary war pension was allowed. He wed 27 June 1793 to Rebekah (Rebecca) Curry who in 1843 gave her age as 73 years (born c1770, FOC). She was a resident of Buncombe Co., NC in 1856 and stated that she had removed there in 1846. Names of children not given. Andrea record #177 Was Rebekah Curry originally from Buncombe Co., NC, and does this provide a clue to the origin of this Thomas Gill? This Thomas Gill served in the Revolution under Capt. James Gill and Capt. John Mills. He is the only Thomas Gill who claims service under Capt. James Gill. He would have been 28 in 1790, but according to the revolutionary pension application, did not marry until 1793. There really is no documentation as to whom this Thomas Gill belongs. My surmise is that he is an undocumented son of old William Gill 1714->1788, about whom we know little. Probably he is not present in the 1790 census as he was as yet unmarried. The image below is his undated signature in a revolutionary war indent in the SCDAH, c1785.

The following was found and submitted by Sheila Evans, and copyright to her. Beware the Ides of March and data that is not primary data! We are here merely making available all that we can find.

Re: Thomas GILL ma. Rebecca CURRY 27 Jun 1793 : Using Virgil White's Abstractsof Rev War Soldiers..pg 1351.

3 children named: Jinsey Ca....n b. 19 Nov 1794; George GILL b. 23 Jun 1798, Melinda b. 1 July 1804 and ...illegible ...b 1806...evidently all born in Chester or York District. (Note by FOC, this list of children does not, I repeat does not, contain the "Samuel Curry Gill" born 1797 in SC listed below. We need to get an original copy of this application.) Samual Curry Gill may have been named for Rebekah Curry and not her child. This was common in this area in this time frame -FOC.

US National Archives Revolutionary War Pension Application of Thomas Gill:

Thomas, Rebecca, W3978, SC Line, sol appl 18 Oct 1832 York Dist SC aged 69 yr 10 m, sol b in 1762 PA, sol lived in Chester Dist SC at enl, sol d 16 Dec 1839, wid appl 31 Dec 1843 York Dist SC aged 74 yr, sol m Rebekah CURRY 27 Jun 1793, children shown were; Jinsey Ca???n b. 19 Nov 1794, George b 23 Jun 1798, Melinda b 1 Jul 1804 & illegible name b. 1806....

This application states that Thomas Gill was born in 1762 in Pennsylvania, and that Rebekah Curry Gill was born c1769.

______note by FOC, in the records below that Sheila found, probably are contained all records of several Thomas Gills. Again, we include them all for completeness. Please use caution!

South Carolina Roster - Soldiers pg 357

GILL, THOMAS W3978 b. 1762 PA d. 16 Dec. 1839 ma. Rebecca Curry, 27 June 1793. He entered service under Capt. JAMES GILL and Maj. ADAIR during June 1779 or 1780 and was sent out against CUNNINGHAM. Next, he was under Capt. John MILLS as a ranger.

**

Just another note re: the name THOMAS GILL

Thomas GILL Pvt. 3rd SC, died 12-2-1776 ** I don't have the ref. here. But he is the same Thomas GILL also noted in the South Carolina Roster pg 357. reads as:

GILL, THOMAS d. 2 December 1776. He enlisted in the Second Regiment on 4 November 1775. N.A. 853.

another THOMAS GILL under Capt James GILL during 1782: South Carolina Roster, pg. 357 reads as:

GILL, THOMAS Jr. - He served 28 days in the militia under Capt. James GILL during 1782. A.A. 2834; I263.

I did not (Yet) copy the above references, I used the pg. 357 SC to cross reference w/Virgil White's List and the DAR Centennial lists.

Buncombe Co., NC will of Rebekah Curry Gill

Posted by B. K. HALL <www.brindak@sybercom.net> on Wed, 27 Sep 2000, in response to George Gill, posted by Frank O. Clark on Tue, 12 Sep 2000

Surname:

Frank, we lucked onto an abstract of the will of Rebecca Gill, who might be our George Gill's mother. Does Rebecca Gill, who was 78 in the 1850 census (and living with A.J. Gill, 36 in the 1850 cen., in Buncombe Co, NC) and A.J. Gill come up in any of your Chester Co., Gills?

Here is what we found: alob, vol. X #4, p. 89-37: "p. 151. 13 oct. 1851. I, Rebecca Gill, being weak in body but of sound mind and memory, do make this my last will & testament. I have seen cause to dispose of my property in the following manner, viz: four of my grandchildren Mary E. N. Gill, Lorena Olevia Gill, Rebecca Emoretta Gill & Viloet Erminta Gill to have one bay mare and one year old colt. (No executor named). Wit: G.E.D. Garrison & A. J. Gill signed Rebecca x Gill. Proved in open court by A. J. Gill this Dec. Term 1851 and ordered to be recorded. Certified by R. B. Vance, clk."

Needless to say, we were thrilled to come across this-to confirm our rebecca emoretta's (& her sisters) names, and to tell us George Gill's mothers name. Again, thank you for your time and for checking your gill records for us.

I have never been able to document this Thomas Gill as kin to the other Gills who lived in Fishing Creek, Chester Co., SC.

Documented Children of Thomas Gill married to Rebekah Curry

1. Jinsey Gill born 19 Nov. 1793

2. George Gill born 23 June 1798

3. Melinda Gill born 1 July 1804

4. illegible Gill born 1806 (Andrew J. GILL?)

Possible child, not documented?????????????

5?. Samuel Curry Gill born c1797 SC died 1857 married Susan Ewing. He apparently is not mentioned in the revolutionary war pension application above - W3978. He would apparently be child number two, if he is a son. (Samuel Curry GILL is a son of John Gill and Hanna CURRY and would therefore be a nephew of Thomas Gill, m. Rebecca CURRY...EAG)

Frank, we lucked onto an abstract of the will of Rebecca Gill, who might be our George Gill's mother. Does Rebecca Gill, who was 78 in the 1850 census (and living with A.J. Gill, 36 in the 1850 cen., in Buncombe Co, NC) and A.J. Gill come up in any of your Chester Co., Gills?

Here is what we found: alob, vol. X #4, p. 89-37: "p. 151. 13 oct. 1851. I, Rebecca Gill, being weak in body but of sound mind and memory, do make this my last will & testament. I have seen cause to dispose of my property in the following manner, viz: four of my grandchildren Mary E. N. Gill, Lorena Olevia Gill, Rebecca Emoretta Gill & Viloet Erminta Gill to have one bay mare and one year old colt. (No executor named). Wit: G.E.D. Garrison & A. J. Gill signed Rebecca x Gill. Proved in open court by A. J. Gill this Dec. Term 1851 and ordered to be recorded. Certified by R. B. Vance, clk."

Needless to say, we were thrilled to come across this-to confirm our rebecca emoretta's (& her sisters) names, and to tell us George Gill's mothers name. Again, thank you for your time and for checking your gill records for us.

I have never been able to document this Thomas Gill as kin to the other Gills who lived in Fishing Creek, Chester Co., SC.

Documented Children of Thomas Gill married to Rebekah Curry

1. Jinsey Gill born 19 Nov. 1793

2. George Gill born 23 June 1798

3. Melinda Gill born 1 July 1804

4. illegible Gill born 1806

Some Early Settlers on Fishing Creek (Continued from Vol. VII, p.10)

SCMAR, Vol. VII, Spring 1979, No. 2, p.82

THOMAS GILL … a plantation or tract of Land Containing 150 acres Situate in Berkley County in the fork between Broad & Saludy Rivers and is bounded on a Small branch of Little River, the waters of Saludy river, and is bounded S. on Mr. Pinckney's Land and on all other sides by vacant Land, Survey certified the 3d day of Dec. 1766 and Granted the 19th day of Feby 1767 to the Mem'st … (sworn) 2 Apr. 1767. Edward Musgrove, D.S. (signed) For the Memorialist, Thomas Edghill (vol. 9, p. 208).

1766 and 1772

South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research, Vol. 7 Search Terms: GILL (15), THOMAS (214) Results (1 combined matches)

1766 The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research page 83 THOMAS GILL … a plantation or tract of Land Containing 150 acres Situate in Berkley County in the fork between Broad & Saludy Rivers and is bounded on a Small branch of Little River, the waters of Saludy river, and is bounded S. on Mr. Pinckney's Land and on all other sides by vacant Land, Survey certified the 3d day [p.83] of Dec. 1766 and Granted the 19th day of Feby 1767 to the Mem'st … (sworn) 2 Apr. 1767. Edward Musgrove, D.S. (signed) For the Memorialist, Thomas Edghill (vol. 9, p. 208).

1772 THOS. GILL … a plantation or tract of Land containing one hundred acres situate in Horse Creek on the West side of Broad River bounding S.W. on Henry Longs, N.W., N.E. & S.E. on vacant Land, Survey Certified the 5th of Aug'st 1772 and Granted 26 Sepr 1772 to the Mem'st … (sworn) 23 Novr 1772. Robt McFadden, D.S. del'd March 1, 1773 to Christopher Stright (vol. 12, p. 1). (This is a Fishing Creek Gill Record) (This can only be the Thomas Gill who married Rebekah Curry), as he has to be 21 to appear in this record, and therefore was born before 1772-21=<1751.

More About THOMAS GILL:

Occupation: Pvt. Rev. War; Farmer

Parents (Facts Pg): s/George Gill and 1st wife

Notes for REBECCA CURRY:

THE BULLETIN-CHESTER DISTRICT GENEELOGICAL SOCIETY, JUNE '91

State of South Carolina, York District

On the 31st day of December 1843 personally appeared before John M. ROSS,Judge of the Court of Ordinary for the District of York, REBECCA GILL, a resi-

dent of York District in the State of South Carolina aged seventy-four years,

who being first duly sworn, according to law, doth on her oath, make the

following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the provision by the Act of Congress passed July 7th, 1838, entitled, "The Act of granting half pay and pensions to certain widows:" That she is the widow of Thomas GILL who was a private in the Revolutionary War, who was also a Revolutionary Pensioner of the United States, on the South Carolina Roll, and when certificate was surrendered on applicationto the Agency on Aging in Charleston for the pension due to deceased husband, the said Thomas GILL.

She further declares that she was married to the said Thomas GILL on the 27th day of June 1793 and that her husband , the aforesaid Thomas GILL died on the 18th day of Decrmber 1839; that she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service; but the marriage took place previous to the first of January, seventeen hundred and ninety four, viz, at the time above stated. She further states that she is now and has remained a widow, ever since the death of her husband, the aforesaid Thomas GILL.

Her

Rebecca GILL

mark

Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written in open court, before me,

signed, John M. Ross

South Carolina, York District:

On this 31st day of December1943 personally appeared before John M. Ross, Judge of the Court of Ordinary for the York District, Williamson BYERS, who being duly sworn, according to law, saith the he was present at the marriage of Thomas GILL and Rebecca CURRY, now Rebecca GILL, and that the marriage took place at the time stated in the Declaration of Rebecca GILL abpve, viz on the 27th day of June 1793, and that the aforesaid Thomas GILL DIED AT THE TIME STATED IN THE DECLARATION.

Sworn to and subcribed on the dayand year above written in open court, before me Signed, Williamson Byers

signed: John M. Ross

Posted by B. K. HALL <www.brinkdak@sybercom.net> on Wed 27 sept 2000 in response to George Gill, posted by Frank O. Clark. Surname:

Frank, we lucked onto an abstract of the will of Rebecca Gill, who might be our George Giil's mother. Does Rebecca Gill, who was 78 in the 1850 census (and living with A. J. Gill, 36 in the 1850 cen. in Buncombe C0., NC) and A. J. Gill came up in any of your Chester Co., GILLS?

ame: Joan Long <joanhlong@aol.com>

Date: 2003-03-07

Curry descendant? yes

Earliest known ancestor and state? Stafford Curry Scotland

Comments:

Last known ancestor is Rebecca Curry who md. Thomas Gill. They lived in Chester SC. He was Rev War Vet. Her son Andrew J. Gill md. into Pickens Family of SC. She moved to Buncombe County, NC after Thomas' death. Rebecca died here.

GEORGE GILL - CHESTER CO

Posted by B. K. HALL <www.brindak@sybercom.net> on Wed, 27 Sep 2000, in response to George Gill, posted by Frank O. Clark on Tue, 12 Sep 2000

Frank, we lucked onto an abstract of the will of Rebecca Gill, who might be our George Gill's mother. Does Rebecca Gill, who was 78 in the 1850 census (and living with A.J. Gill, 36 in the 1850 cen., in Buncombe Co, NC) and A.J. Gill come up in any of your Chester Co., Gills?

Here is what we found: alob, vol. X #4, p. 89-37: "p. 151. 13 oct. 1851. I, Rebecca Gill, being weak in body but of sound mind and memory, do make this my last will & testament. I have seen cause to dispose of my property in the following manner, viz: four of my grandchildren Mary E. N. Gill, Lorena Olevia Gill, Rebecca Emoretta Gill & Viloet Erminta Gill to have one bay mare and one year old colt. (No executor named). Wit: G.E.D. Garrison & A. J. Gill signed Rebecca x Gill. Proved in open court by A. J. Gill this Dec. Term 1851 and ordered to be recorded. Certified by R. B. Vance, clk."

Needless to say, we were thrilled to come across this-to confirm ourRebecca Emoretta's (& her sisters) names, and to tell us George Gill's mothers name. Again, thank you for your time and for checking your gill records for us.

I (FOC) am pretty sure this is "Rebekah" Curry, wife of Thomas Gill who appears in Chester Co., SC records. I have never been able to document this Thomas Gill as kin to the other Gills who lived in Fishing Creek, Chester Co., SC.

More About REBECCA CURRY:

Burial: Age 74 in 1843

Occupation: Housewife

Parents (Facts Pg): d/Samuel CURRY-Jane CARSON

Relative: bro:Francis Curry 1768-49

More About THOMAS GILL and REBECCA CURRY:

Marriage: June 27, 1793, York Co., SC

Children of THOMAS GILL and REBECCA CURRY are:

i. LIN(D)SEY CARSON4 GILL, b. November 19, 1794, York Co., SC.

Notes for LIN(D)SEY CARSON GILL:

Apparently named after LINDSAY CARSON, father of Christopher Houston CARSON, now widely known as "Kit Carson" the great Indian Scout. "Kit" was born on Hunting Creek, within a half a mile of Mr. Thomas YOUNG

1880 Census, Index (D - J), Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana

Submitted by Sandra McLellan, Priestner@comcast.net

U

More About LIN(D)SEY CARSON GILL:

Parents (Facts Pg): s/Thomas GILL-Rebecca CURRY

11. ii. GEORGE GILL, b. June 23, 1798, York Co., SC.

iii. MELINDA GILL, b. July 01, 1804, York Co., SC; m. ROBERT STRICKLIN.

More About MELINDA GILL:

Parents (Facts Pg): d/Thomas GILL-Rebecca CURRY

iv. ILLEGIB;LE GILL, b. June 23, 1806.

12. v. ANDREW JACKSON GILL, b. 1814, York Co., SC; d. Abt. 1905, Buncombe Co., NC.

3. ABRAHAM3 GILL (GEORGE2, THOMAS1 GILL?) was born 1765 in Probably PA., and died August 20, 1815 in Chester Co., S.C.. He married (1) UNKNOWN.????? He married (2) AGNESS WALKER 1791 in SO Carolina, daughter of ROBERT WALKER and JANE FERGUSON. She was born 1765, and died October 01, 1815 in Chester Co., S.C..

Notes for ABRAHAM GILL:

Abraham Gill, father of Lucinda Jane Gill, and son of George Gill, Sr., later acquired the Glover tract and a part of an adjoining tract granted to his uncle Robert Gill in 1771. He resided there until his death in an old log house constructed before the Revolution that was still standing in 1958. Abraham's fine intellect was whetted by his love of classical Latin and Greek studies, while his manual dexterity found an outlet through carpentry. Practical and stable he also seemed well suited to farming.

After the Revolutinary War had drawn to a close, Abraham had signed a petition to the SC General Assembly stating that, "We at the earliest hour of the late war with Great Britain entered the field in defence of our country," and asked for renumeration (No. 101 1788), so he must have served in the militia toward the end of the war. He married Agnes Walker (daughter of Robert Walker) about 1791, and bought land, a small plantation from Robert Gill Sr. By 1801 and until their deaths, he and Agnes were communicants of Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church, along with other Gill relatives.

At the close of the War of 1812, Abraham Gill's wagons were employed by the U.S. War Department to transport the 3rd U.S. Rifle Regiment under Col. William Southerland Hamilton from Mount Dearborn on the Catawba River to Richmond Va., during November and December of 1814, for which his estate was paid $2,123.

Eight slaves worked Abraham's farm, raising wheat, corn, cotton, flax, rye, hay cattle and swine. Most of his horses bore names: Dick, Rock, Buck, Bully, Jolly, Black. Plenty of farm implements and riding gear were housed in barns and sheds, including several wagons and one "chair" (a small one passenger covered vehicle pulled by a horse). Of special pride were Abraham's four hounds. He fed and trained them well. When it was time for a hunt, he probably delighted at the baying of his dogs as they found their prey. Afluent men often kept hounds for hunting deer in that area. At hunt's end he blew on his horn to gather his hounds in. A "rifle gun" and musket served him well.

Abraham was not only a yoeman farmer, but a carpenter also. Using draw knives, an inshave (for cutting the concave side of staves) and a crozer (for grooving the top and bottom of barrels or buckets) he fashioned containers with the skill of a cooper. Iron or wooden bands were used to hold the staves together. With his foot adze Abraham trimmed logs, ready to split for his carpentry needs. Through the use of his carpenter's square and cutting boxes he fashioned other wooden objects. Finish work was accomplished with planes, chisels and augers.

Agnes supervised the work within her large house, which included enough bedrooms to hold seven beds and bedroom furniture, besides the living area and kitchen. In another room three flaxwheels and two cotton spinning wheels were kept busy by her slaves as they spun wool from the six sheep, and cotton and flax, for household use.

Inside their home an appreciation of the finer life was reflected.

Brass-headed firedogs flanked the flames in the fireplace, and rows of Latin, Greek, and English books stood tall on their shelves, and five Windsor chairs graced the living area. A small tea table was set for late afternoon refreshment. Of particular beauty was an inlaid bureau and a tall-cased clock with wooden gears. A "falling leaf table" and small dining table with six chairs furnished their dining area. In the kitchen. ample numbers of crockery-ware, pewter plates and flatware, dishes and tinware were housed in cupboards. Pickling tubs and jars, churns, and kegs of soap were stored to one side. Coffee pots, a copper kettle, large and small pots, frying pans, and dutch ovens stood in their places on the large hearth. Two spiders (three legged frames for holding pans above hot coals) stood beside the fireplace. A long-handled toaster (which was held over the fire) and flesh forks hung along the wall. (The above description of farm and household items was taken from their extensive personal inventory records. Bk F p50)

Abraham saw that his children were well educated. Their oldest son,

Robert Walker Gill, became a teacher. One young fellow, Samuel Shaw Porter, who had received a rural school education in reading, writing and arithmetic, "with 40 hard-earned dollars, commenced his classical studies under Robert Walker Gill, studying the Latin language in 1813-14." He boarded at Robert's father Abraham's home six miles from his own house, receiving his instruction and room for 50 cents per week (according to Samuel Porter's autobiography written in 1859).

Josiah Henry Gill, another son of Abraham and Agnes, stayed in Chester County and was an active communicate in Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church, along with his wife and four daughters. In 1827 he sat on the Bench of Elders.

On August 20th, 1815, Abraham died. Six weeks later, on October 1st, his widow Agnes also died. Perhaps they succumbed to an epidemic, for Doctor James Simpson was paid $31 from the estate. They were both 50 years old, and were buried side by side in the Fishing Creek Church cemetery. Near by lay the graves of old Robert Gill (1720-1804) and his wife Ellenor (1721-1801).

The five children must have been overcome with the loss of both their parents. Robert W. was 23, Mary 21, Eli 19, and Josiah 17. Fourteen year old Lucinda was warded to her brother Robert. Their personal estate totaled $8,219.47, which was a considerable amount for that period.

(All of the above information was condensed from Twyla Gill Wright's

"LATCHSTINGS" published 1987).

------------------------------------------

ABRAHAM GILL Estate File number 22-216-B Chester Co., SC

ABRAHAM GILL

Who died intestate in Chester County, SC

ADM. BOND: sg. 10 November 1815 L 2000

ROBERT WALKER GILL Adm.

Thomas McCLURE

William STRINGFELLOW Bondsmen

List of heirs:

ROBERT WALKER GILL

JOSIAH H. GILL

ELI GILL

MARY A. GILL wife of William BRADFORD, Jr.

LUCINDA GILL who was the ward of ROBERT W. GILL her brother until 1822 when she received full payment of her share of her father's estate.

>From the old Fishing Creek Churchyard:

ABRAHAM GILL/ died 20 August 1815/ age to 50 years (b. 1765)

--------------------------------------------

ABRAHAM GILL AND AGNES WALKER

OF CHESTER DISTRICT, SOUTH CAROLINA

by: Andrew L. Leath

P. O. Box 1166

Tyler, TX 75710

Rev. 1.0

November 2004

INTRODUCTION

I have compiled this timeline to share with other researchers what I know of Abraham Gill and his wife Agnes Walker Gill of Chester istrict, South Carolina. The timeline lists in chronological order the records I have found that mention them.

Children of Abraham and Agnes Gill:

1. Robert Walker Gill b. c1792 d. bef. 1835 m. Elizabeth S. ___

2. Mary A. Gill b. c1794 m. William Wylie Bradford

3. Eli Gill b. c1795 d. 1834 m. Mary W. Davis "Polly"

4. Josiah Henry Gill b. 1798 d. 1878 m. Mary A. Bradford, m2nd Sarah R. Simmons

5. Lucinda Jane Gill b. 1800/1 d. 1885 m. John Alexander Morrow.

CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF DOCUMENTS

1764/5 - Abraham Gill born, son of George and Mary Gill. Year of birth is estimated from information on his tombstone in Fishing Creek Cem., Chester Co., SC. Parentage from LATCHSTRINGS by Twyla Gill Wright (1987) and Chester Co., SC, Deed Records R:191.

1764/5 - Agnes Walker born, daughter of Robert Walker and Sarah Wylie. Year of birth is estimated from information on her tombstone in Fishing Creek Cem., Chester Co., SC. Proof of parentage is from the will of Robert Walker (1792) and statement by her daughter Lucinda J. Morrow in 1877 found in the Draper manuscripts and abstracted in Elmer Oris Parker "The First Gills in Chester County, South Carolina," The Bulletin 9 (Dec. 1986), pp. 103-4. The Bulletin is the publication by the Chester District Genealogical Society.

1792, Dec. 19 - Abraham Gill named in the will of Robert Bradford of Chester Co. as his son-in-law, to receive 5 shillings.

1797, July 26 - Abraham Gill, Revd. James Fowler, and Agness McElhany, witnesses to the will of John Gill decd, made oath in court to prove the will. (Brent H. Holcomb & Elmer O. Parker, Chester County, South Caroline, Minutes of the County Court, 1785-1799 (1979), p. 376)

1801, Sep. 6 - Lucenda, daughter of Abr. Gill, baptized at Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church. (Brent H. Holcomb & Elmer O. Parker, Early Records of Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church, Chester County, South Carolina 1799-1859, p. 21)

1802 - Abram Gill and Agnes Gill joined Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church. (Brent H. Holcomb & Elmer O. Parker, Early Records of Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church, Chester County, South Carolina 1799-1859, p. 23)

1802, July 2 - Abraham Gill of Chester Dist., planter, sold to Christopher Strait, of Chester Dist., planter, for $190, 39 acres, part of tract orig. granted to Susannah Glooss 10 Jul 1766, conveyed several times since then, start widow Ferguson's land, N 20 W 120 poles to South Fork Fishing Creek, on creek to dogwood cush, S on said creek, S 20 E 110 poles to widow Ferguson's line, S 70 W 54 poles 17 lks to start. Witnesses were Andrew Downing, Saml. Lowrey, and Leonard Strait. (Chester Co., SC, Deed Records L:85)

1805, May 2 - Abram Gill, Chester Dist., gave to Samuel Kelsey & John Thompson, executors of the estate of Robert Gill decd, Chester Dist., for $669, a mortgage on 250 acres, "plantation where I now live" on South Fork Fishing Creek, and negros Cato & Hagar. Gill stated he was indebted to the execs. Witnesses were Leonard Strait and Robt. Gill.

(Chester Co., SC, Deed Records L:190) (Could it be possible that this Robt. Gill be Robt. M. Gill??? Could Robert M. Gill be a son of Abraham and a previous parriage???? EAG)

Notes for ROBERT M. GILL:

Robert M. Gill of Wilkenson Co., MS gives power of attorney to Dr. John Dunovant of Chester to sell my portion of the lands coming from my late father Abraham Gill to James Strait "The lands divided between me and George Gill at Pinckneyville Ct. coming from the estate of the late George Gill.

1806, Nov. 3 - Abraham Gill's name drawn to be part of petit and common jury pool at next term of court (Chester Dist., SC, Common Pleas Minute Book, transcript (1935), p. 405, microfilm)

1807, March 30 - Abraham Gill appeared in court to serve as petit and common juror, assigned to jury #2 (Chester Dist., SC, Common Pleas Minute Book, transcript (1935), p. 412-413, microfilm)

1808, June 4 - Abraham Gill of Chester Dist. sold to James Straight, Chester Dist., all of part of tract "divided between George Gill and myself" by commissioners appointed by court of common pleas holden at Pinkneyville to divide the lands belonging to the est. of George Gill decd. Start, N 60 W 11.80 poles, S 60 W poles, S 40 W 6.50 poles to creek, up creek, N 45 E 34.46 poles, N 35 E 31.75 poles, S 55 E 31.75 poles, S 35 W 31.75 poles, S 55 E 2.50 poles, S 30 W 12 poles to start on South Fork of Fishing Creek in the District of Chester and York. Witnesses were J. Rosborough and John Barr. (Chester Co., SC, Deed Records R:191)

1810 - Abram Gill appears on the census of Chester Dist., SC, with 2 males 10-18, 1 male 18-16, 1 male 26-45, 1 female under 10, 2 female 10-18, 1 female 26-45, and three slaves (p. 265)

1813-1814 Samuel Shaw Porter boarded at the home of Abram Gill during the week while attending a school taught by his son Robert Walker Gill. (letter from Dr. Samuel Shaw Porter to daughter Mrs. A. H. Nicks, 7 Oct 1859, published in The Descendants of the Bownfield and Porter Families (1987) by Max Perry)

1814, Oct. 31 - Abraham Gill's name drawn to be part of petit and common jury pool at next term of court (Chester Dist., SC, Common Pleas Minute Book, transcript (1935), p. 513, microfilm)

1815, April 3 - Abraham Gill appeared in court to serve as petit and common juror, but his name was not drawn for either jury (Chester Dist., SC, Common Pleas Minute Book, transcript (1935), p. 520, microfilm)

1815, August 17 - Abraham Gill of Chester Dist. bought from William Stringfellow, Chester Dist., for $275, 48 acres on Rocky Creek, had belonged to the estate of James Pagan decd, the part allotted to Peggy Pagan, alias Peggy Kelsey. Witnesses were R. W. Gill and W. W. Bradford. (Chester Co., SC, Deed Records R:220)

1815, August 20 - death of Abraham Gill. Date from tombstone, Fishing Creek Cem., Chester Co., SC.

1815, Oct. 1 - death of Agnes Walker Gill. Date from tombstone, Fishing Creek Cem., Chester Co., SC.

1815, Nov. - Robert Walker Gill posted bond as the administrator of the estate of Abraham Gill, decd. His sureties were Thomas L. McLure and William Stringfellow. (Original bond, Chester Co., SC, Probate File 22 Pkg 316, microfilm)

1815, Dec. 6 - Inventory of the estate of Abraham Gill filed, including slaves Cato $600, Will $475, Hannah $350, Aggy $380, Ame $237, Mary & child Charles $500, Sophy $200, 7 horses and 2 wagons $542, 24 cattle $143.50, swine $90, 6 sheep $12.20, geese $8, a receipt on Thomas Moore for duplicate accts. against the War Department of United State for collection $2123, etc. total $8219.47. Appraisers were Leonard Strait, Robt. G. Mills, Alexander Pagan. . (Original inventory, Chester Co., SC, Probate File 22 Pkg 316, microfilm)

1815, Dec. 11 - sale of the estate of Abraham Gill. Slaves Cato, Will, Hanna, and Sophy sold to R. W. Gill, Agness to Laprey Chisholm, Mary & child to Doctor Jennings, Ame to Wm. Bradford. (Original return of sale, Chester Co., SC, Probate File 22 Pkg 316, microfilm)

1816, Feb. 17 - Robert W. Gill, administrator of the estate of Abraham Gill, decd, of Chester Dist. bought from Carson Pagan, Chester Dist., for $250, 66 acres on Rocky Cr., part of estate of James Pagan allotted to Carson Pagan. Start near Foxes Spring, N 86 E 18 poles, N 4 W 35 poles, E 17 N 17 poles, S 10 E 35 poles to start. Witnesses were John Kelsey Sen. and Wm. Pagan. . (Chester Co., SC, Deed Records R:307)

1817 - Robert Robinson, Shff., Chester Dist., to J. H. Gill, $224.75, 69 acres Rocky Creek, start, N 10 E 40 poles, N 71.5 E 17.40 poles, S 4 E 43.50 poles, then to start. By order of court of common pleas at Chester Court House Mar 1817 from return of commissioners on writ of partition of Robert W. Gill vs. Eli Gill, Wm. Bradford & wf., Josiah Gill, and Lucinda Gill, defs., judgment to sell land. (Chester Co., SC, Deed Records S:239)

1834, July 3 - Patience Stringfellow, wife of William Stringfellow, released her dower in deed to Abraham Gill. (Note by A.L.Leath - see 17 Aug 1815 deed) (Chester Co., SC, Deed Records Z:498)

More About ABRAHAM GILL:

Burial: Row 6, Fishing Creek Presbyterian Churchyard Cem., Chester Co., S.C.

Military service: Capt. in Revolutionary War

Occupation: Soldier-Farmer-Carpenter

More About AGNESS WALKER:

Burial: Row 6, Fishing Creek Presbyterian Churchyard Cem., Chester Co., S.C.

Residence: A "Rocky Creek Walker"

More About ABRAHAM GILL and AGNESS WALKER:

Marriage: 1791, SO Carolina

Child of ABRAHAM GILL and UNKNOWN is:???????????

i. ROBERT M.4 GILL, b. Abt. 1786, Of Wilkenson Co., MS; m. MARY UNKNOWN; b. 1794, SC; d. November 10, 1816, Chester District, SC; in her 22d year. This Mrs. Mary Gill is buried in Row 6 beside the graves of Abraham and Agnes in Fishing Creek Presbyterian Chyd.

Notes for ROBERT M. GILL:

The Robert M. Gill in Wilkinson Co., MS in 1820 is perfectly consistent with the Robert Gill in Marion Co., MS in 1816. It would appear that this Robert Gill had no children with him in MS, and his wife died between 1811 and 1816.

Robert M. Gill of Wilkenson Co., MS gives power of attorney to Dr. John Dunovant of Chester to sell my portion of the lands coming from my late father Abraham Gill to James Strait "The lands divided between me and George Gill at Pinckneyville Ct. coming from the estate of the late George Gill.

THE WOODVILLE REPUBLICAN - Vol 3 - January 8, l848 - January 9, l855

24 Oct l848 - Robert M. Gill, Esqr., is a candidate for the office of Colonel of the 5th Regiment of the first Brigade of the first Division of Mississippi Militia, for the County of Wilkinson.

Could this be the same Robert GILL?????

Following is an excerpt from the "Sullivan County Historical Society Newsletter", Vol. 7 No. 1 January 1980 whole No. 33:

Since we are meeting in Turman township perhaps more about its early history would be interesting. The following article was written by Samuel S, Brewer and appeared in the 30 March 1939 issue of the SULLIVAN UNION, This was one of many articles clipped from the Union and put in scrapbooks by Dr. James B. Maple. Both Dr. Maple and Mr. Brewer were interested in Sullivan County history. Dr. Maple notes in his scrapbooks that there are inaccuracies in Mr. rewer's writing, some articles being more fictional than factual. I know nothing about that so I can only copy his article like it was written. It may be abridged somewhat to fit in the space available in the Newsletter. We are indebted to Dr. Maple for his interesting and many scrapbooks on Sullivan County happenings. They are now on microfilm at the Sullivan Public Library. This article is about the Turman Blockhouse being rebuilt as Fort Turman.

"A second auxillary fortification included in the grand design for a complete chain of military defenses, of which the large Half-Way Fort on Gill's Prairie was the main axis of the entire systen, erected in anticipation of the War of 1812, was a fort to be built at the juncture of the Tippecanoe trail (Harrison Trail) with the Ontario or Ottawa Indian trail,, near the Big Springs in what is now Turman township, Sullivan County. Already standing at this strategic point was ' a block-house which had been built by Benjamin Turman in 1810, and it was at this place near the Big Springs that General William Henry Harrison camped with his army on the evening of Sept. 28, 1811, on his northward advance, and also on the evening of Nov. 10 following, upon his return from the Battle of Tippecanoe,

This block-house stood about 8 miles north of the Half-Way Fort on Gill's Prairie, and the same was taken over and enlarged into a fort and named Fort Turman, The old block-house was rebuilt a large area surrounding the same was enclosed with a stockade of timbers,, and the whole equipped and made into a headquarters for scouts and spies, with a major part of the garrison consisting of mounted rangers to do patrol duty between this.fort and the main headquarters at the Half-Way Fort 8 miles to the southward, as well as for duty along the Ontario trail running to the northeast into the Province of Ontario, Canada, and to the northward as far as Fort Harrison on the main Tippecanoe trail,, now made into the Harrison Military road.

The exact site where Fort Turman stood is now surveyed as the Northwest of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 25 Township 8 North, Range 11 West, in Turman township; the same being about 1/3 of a mile due west of the prehistoric Mound Builder's hill where the Mann cemetery is located and just west and to the rear of where now stands the former residence of the late Hon, James B. Mann, who built the same many years ago. The old Harrison Military roadq formerly the main Tippecanoe Indian trail running between this residence and the hill where the Mann cemetery is located.

During the period of time that Fort Turman was used as a military outpost for the Half-Way Fort, it was the main headquarters for the scouts, spies,and mounted rangers,, who maintained a line of communications between General Harrison's army in northern Ohio and Colonel William Taylor Quartermaster General, in command of the Half-Way Fort. It was over this line of communications that the first news of Commodore Oliver H. Perry's victory on Lake Erie was received, the same being rushed to Colonel Taylor by mounted by him relayed over the military semiphore to Fort Coupee, and from there sent by boat to Vincennes and Kentucky, where the glorious news were received for the first time in the then settled parts of this country west of Pittsburgh. Also, it was over this same line of communications (the old Ontario Indian trail) that Colonel Taylor received his orders from General Harrison to forward provisions and supplies by boats up the Wabash River to Fort Wayne, from the warehouses at the Half-Way Fort.

To keep this vital line of communications intact, a considerable force of mounted rangers and scouts were required, some of whom would be on duty for many days at a time. To house and feed the many horses needed to furnish the mounts for the large force,, required the building of many barns within the stockade enclosure of Fort Turman, and also a place for the storage of feed and fodder for the same. Fort Turman was a place of great activity at this time. Scouts and spies were constantly arriving and departing at all hours both by day and night.

After the close of the War of 1812 Fort Turman was closed by the Government and the tract of land upon which it stood was sold to Benjamin Turman,, the builder of the Turman block-house, on Sept. 10, 1816, Benjamin Turman being the first settler to locate in what is now Turman township, and after whom the township took its name. The eldest son of Benjamin Turman was Thomas Turman. He married Lavina White,, a daughter of William White and Ann Balch White. Their daughter,, Fidelia. Turman, married Hon. James B. Mann, a son of Hon. Josiah T. Mann, the first Judge of the Sullivan County Court, when the county seat was at Merom. Hon. James B. Manng after his marriage to Fidelia Turman built the residence now standing near the site of the original

Turman block-house,, later Fort Turman,

It was at this place that Major Hamtramck camped in the fall of 1790, In his expedition across western Sullivan county against the Indians of northern Indiana and Illinois, and it was from this camp that he sent Captain Hardy Hill with a company of scouts among whom were James Ledgerwood and Robert Gill to march up the Ontario Indian trail to the northeast and open up a line of communications with General Harmar's army, then marching northward through Ohio, and it was Captain Hardy Hill who hurried back to Major Hamtramck, then located with his army north of the present City of Terre Haute, with the distressing news of Gen. Harmar's complete defeat by the Indians, which news was brought back to Captain Hardy Hill by Lieut, John Vaughn who had been detailed by Capt. Hill to go on a particularly dangerous mission with James Ledgerwood and Robert Gill, two expert scouts, to obtain the same.

On the above mentioned trip James Ledgerwood was captured by Indians and taken with them to the region around Detroit, where he was held until 1800,or ten years later when his liberty was obtained by exchange through the efforts of two of his old scout friends, Lewis and Sol Wetzel, both famous early day scouts in Kentucky. After release from this long captivity he returned to Kentucky, made his will there in 1802, witnessed by Sol and Lewis Wetzel, and came to Sullivan county in 1803 to become its first settler locating near the present town of Carlisle. He died in the latter part of 1806 or early in 1807. His will was first probated in Kentucky, and a transcript of the same was filed at Vincennes Ind., in 1812.

Robert Gill the other scout, made his escape but was compelled to go direct to Kentucky to do so, and Lieut. John Vaughn was able to elude the Indians and made the report to Captain Hardy Hill of the terrible Harmar disaster and by him taken direct to Major Hamtramck,, who ordered a hasty retreat before the Indians could arrive at the Big Springs and cut off his retreat to Vincennes; his escape being only a few hours ahead of the Indians.

*************

Vol.. 7 No. 5 " Sullivan Cpimtu Historical Society News Letter", sated SAept. 1980, Whole No. 37:

"The first Physician was Dr. Whellelsey (sic); the first Minister of the Gospel, Robert Gill; the first school was taught by Edward Ransford, a soldier of the Revolution . The first settler in Gill Township was William Gill; the first in Hamilton was Benjamin Long; the first in Cass Township was William Pugh; the first in Jackson , William Shepherd; in Curry; William Curry; in Fairbanks, Thomas Pogue; in Turman, Benjamin Turman.

More About ROBERT M. GILL:

Census: 1820, Resided in Wilkinson Co., MS 000001-00000-0

Comment: October 04, 1848, Robert M. GILL a candidate for for the office of Colonel of the 5th Regiment of the first Brigade of the first Division of Mississippi Militia, for the County of Wilkinson.

More About MARY UNKNOWN:

Burial: Row 6, Fishing Creek Presbyterian Churchyard, Chester, SC; grave is next to graves of Abraham and Agness Walker GILL

Children of ABRAHAM GILL and AGNESS WALKER are:

13. ii. ROBERT WALKER4 GILL, b. 1792, Chester Co., S.C.; d. 1834, Probably SC; age 42 years.

14. iii. MARY A(N). GILL, b. 1794; d. Bef. 1827.

15. iv. ELI GILL, b. 1796, Chester Co., S.C.; d. September 29, 1834, Probably Lancaster, SC.

16. v. MAJOR JOSIAH HENRY GILL, b. July 24, 1798, Chester Co., S.C.; d. October 10, 1878, Homer, Claiborne Parish,Louisiana.

vi. LUCINDA JANE GILL, b. 1800, Chester Co., SC; d. 1885, Probably Plantersville, Dallas Co., Ala.; m. JOHN ALEXANDER MORROW; b. 1797; d. 1869, Plantersville, Dallas Co., Ala..

Notes for LUCINDA JANE GILL:

Lucinda wrote to Dr. Lyman Copeland Draper, in part June 1877: I was born and raised and married in So. Carolina. I am the daughter of ABRAHAM GILL who lived and died on Fishing Creek 10 miles northeast of Chesterville. My mother was Agnes Walker. Her father was wounded in the Revolutionary War & died from the wound at last. Col. John Mills' wife and Col George Gill was cousins to my father. Col. (William) Bratton lived 5 miles from father's near where but I was only 15 years of age when my father and mother died in six weeks of each other so what I know about the incidents of the Revolutionary War are mostly from history." In April she had written Draper, "I am 76 years of age. My husband (John Alexander Morrow) has been dead 8 years. He has only one brother living. I would like to oblige you but my frame is fast sinking away."

Col. John Mills' wife according to contemporary records was Mary Gill

(1758-1841), daughter of Robert Gill (1720-1804) and his wife Eleanor

(1721-1801). Col. George Gill (1761-1844) was a son of John Gill (1727-1797) and his wife Sarah Duncan. Capt. Abraham Gill (1765-1815) was a son of George Gill (c1730-1795), a clockmaker and silversmith by trade. Hence it is readily apparent that if Mary Gill, Col. George Gill, and Capt. Abraham Gill were all first cousins, then their Gill fathers were brothers.

It is generally accepted that the Gills emigrated from Northern Ireland and settled first in New Jersey. If Hugh Cooper (1720-1793), a weaver, was a native of County Armagh, and settled in Somerset CO., NJ., and an alleged brother-in-law to Robert Gill, then it is likely that the Gills followed the same route. The Gills by the early 1760s had removed to eastern Pennsylvania. Thence to Chester Co., SC in late 1760s. (See Robert, John, and George)

Lucinda Jane, who provided the answer to the Gill question, was the

youngest of the children of Abraham Gill and Agnes Walker. Lucinda's

maternal grandfather Robert Walker, according to his Commanding Officer, Col. Edward Lacey, was at the battle of King's Mountain "shot through the body, near the heart, by one in his view, and having his gun loaded at the time, he after this took deliberate aim and shot his opponent dead." He survived the war and lived until 1793, but according to Lucinda his wound was a contributing cause of his death. From Lucinda's statement we may deduce that she was born late in the year 1800.

More About LUCINDA JANE GILL:

Baptism: September 06, 1801, Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church

Parents (Facts Pg): d/Abraham GILL-Agnes Walker

4. JOHN3 GILL (GEORGE2, THOMAS1 GILL?) was born 1767, and died Abt. 1819 in Probably York Co., SC. He married HANNAH CURRY, daughter of SAMUEL CURRY and JANE CARSON. She was born Abt. 1775 in York Co., SC.

Notes for JOHN GILL:

Early York District, So. Carolina Deeds--GILL Book G, Page 538, No. 877, 11 May 1813

Grantor: John GILL & Hanna GILL, his wife of the one part, both at Chester District and Mary GILL of York District of the other part, whereas the said John GILL by his bond or obligation bearing equal date with these presents stands bounds to the said Mary GILL her heirs.......in the sum of one hundred and forty dollars with a condition thereunder written for the payment of seventy dollars for legal interest for the same on or beforethe first day of October next insuring the date hereof...that for the better securing the said sum of seventy dollars...doth grant or sell unto said Mary GTILL all that tract... of land...in York District on the waters of Fishing Creek, Beginning at a maple David Jackson corner thence...on Samuel CURRY'S corner, thence....with S. CURRY and Jane McWHORTER line....containing 102 acres....If the said John GILL & Hanna GILL....shall well and truly pay....Mary GILL...the full sum of seventy dollars....everything herein...shall be void....

In the presence of :

Francis CURRY /s/ John GILL (his mark)

Thomas W. GILL Hannah GILL (her mark)

((On 30 Sept. 1815, John & Hanna sold the land to William G. Henderson (Book H, p. 545 #72)

So they paid Mary GILL & voided this collateral deed.

EARLY DEEDS-YORK DISTRICT, SC---GILL SURNAME

Book H, page 54 & 55, # 72, 30 Sept. 1815

John GILL & Hannah GILL of York District, in consideration pf the sum of four hundred fifty dollars to us paid by William B. HENDERSON of the district aforesaid have granted...said William, B. HENDERSON all that tract of land lying on the headwaters of Fishing Creek, a branch of the Catawba River beginning at a maple David JACKSON'S

Cyrus Gill of Chester District, SC was granted power of attorney...to

sell 323 acres of land situated on Fishing Creek and belonging to John Gill, dec'd. Adjacent land of Edward Croft/McElhenney/Elijah Brown/Samuel Porter. Attorney granted by William Gill of Sullivan County, State of Indiana and was signed 27 February 1819. (Since this John Gill is a brother to my great-grandfather William Gill of Sullivan Co., IN, it would seem reasonable to assume that this power of attorney applied to this John GILL.. E. A. Gill)

1

Page Num. 11

YORK DIST., SOUTH CAROLINA

1800 CENSUS INDEX Compiled by: Paul R. Sarrett, Jr.

Revised: 12/17/95 prsr@aol.com

SINDX L Name F Name NARS Pg# Family Group

----- --------------- --

G400 GILL John M-32 968 20010-20100-00

1800 - Last name, first name, page, males (under 10, 10-15, 16-25, 26-44, 45+), females (under 10, 10-15, 16-25, 26-44, 45+), other free persons, slaves 2, 0, 0, 1, 0 2, 0, 1, 0, 0.

Capt. Kam

More About JOHN GILL:

Parents (Facts Pg): son George Gill and 1st wife

Children of JOHN GILL and HANNAH CURRY are:

i. DAU4 GILL, b. Bet. 1790 - 1800.

ii. DAU. GILL, b. Bet. 1790 - 1800.

iii. THOMAS O. GILL, b. Bet. 1790 - 1800; m. (1) MARY B. HAYES, August 05, 1829, Madison Co., AL; b. Abt. 1809; m. (2) SALLIE J. SMITH, February 08, 1859, Madison Co., AL.

More About THOMAS GILL and MARY HAYES:

Marriage: August 05, 1829, Madison Co., AL

More About THOMAS GILL and SALLIE SMITH:

Marriage: February 08, 1859, Madison Co., AL

17. iv. SAMUEL CURRY GILL, b. March 22, 1796, Chester Co., SC; d. May 19, 1857, Pontotoc Co., MISS (Now Lee Co., MS).

v. BENJAMIN W. GILL, b. Abt. 1811; m. ELIZABETH M. MOORELEY, August 17, 1831, Madison Co., AL; b. Abt. 1811.

More About BENJAMIN GILL and ELIZABETH MOORELEY:

Marriage: August 17, 1831, Madison Co., AL

vi. ROBERT G. GILL, b. Bef. 1819, York Co., SC.

More About ROBERT G. GILL:

Grand-parents: Gs George, Sr - first wife

Parents (Facts Pg): s/John GILL-Hannah CURRY

5. MARY3 GILL (GEORGE2, THOMAS1 GILL?) was born 1774 in Chester Co., SO Carolina, and died 1818 in Hopkins Co., KY. She married ELI BISHOP February 27, 1809 in Hopkins Co., KY by Rev. John Bourland. He was born 1780, and died 1860.

Notes for MARY GILL:

After marriage, the young couple happily made their home on their Hopkins County, KY acreage. They were only married 9 years before Mary died. Eli lived a long, long life. In 1860, he was 80 years old and living with his second wife, Jane, and their two daughters Rosaline and Celeste. He was still farming, and his real estate was worth $4000, with his personal property value at $2700. He must have lived in or near Madisonville, Ky., for that is where he received his mail.

In his will, which Eli made in April 1860, he left his property to his widow Jane. At her death or marriage the land would then go to their two daughters. To his and Mary Gill Bishop's son Orlean Bishop went all his slaves. To the children of Mary and Eli's deceased daughter, Elvira Nichols, he gave a 63 acre tract of land. He also listed the advancements which he had already made to his two older children: Orlean had received $500 and a horse worth $60, and Elvira (before her death) had received $271 and a horse worth $60. He appointed his son Orlean as his estate executor. His will was probated on June 12, 1865.

More About MARY GILL:

Burial: 1818, PROBABLY Hopkins Co., KY

Parents (Facts Pg): d/George GILL SR.-Mary LEWIS (?)

More About ELI BISHOP:

Occupation: Deputy Surveyor

More About ELI BISHOP and MARY GILL:

Marriage: February 27, 1809, Hopkins Co., KY by Rev. John Bourland

Children of MARY GILL and ELI BISHOP are:

18. i. ORLEAN4 BISHOP, b. 1811, Hopkins Co., KY; d. 1862, Madisonville, Ky.

19. ii. ELVIRA BISHOP, b. 1813, Hopkins Co., KY; d. May 24, 1858, Hopkins Co., KY.

6. JR. GEORGE3 GILL (GEORGE2, THOMAS1 GILL?) was born July 13, 1775 in Chester Co., SO Carolina, and died March 11, 1848 in Independence Co. AR. He married JANE CARTER Abt. 1806 in Hopkins Co., KY ?. She was born in Chester Co., SC, and died August 15, 1849 in Independence Co., AR.

Notes for JR. GEORGE GILL:

When George Gill Jr. and Jane Carter Gill left Kentucky in the winter of 1815, they traveled by ox wagon with two other families: Col. Stewart's and Robert Livingston's. Together they may have taken one of two routes into that part of the Missouri Territory designated as Lawrence County (present state of Arkansas). They arrived at Davidsonville on the Black River, a tiny village which had been established by French settlers that same year. It became the site of the first post office in Arkansas two years later. Hardy travelers passed that way on the river and over the military road which led from St. Louis to Texas. From there the three families had to cut their way through the virgin timber, following creeks toward the White River. It is said that they went up Chaney Fork of Strawberry River, then down Mill Creek to Wideman, and to the south of Ruthie's Spring Branch.

When they reached the vicinity of present Mt. Olive, AR, on the White River, they camped together during Christmas week. Jane needed rest desperately, for her unborn baby was near term. George preached a sermon to the small group on that Sabbath, leading them to give thanksgiving for their Lord's protection, and asking for further providential care. It is said that he preached the first sermon in the northern part of AR. That week the men blazed a pine and put their names and date on them. Two of the pines stood for many years. According to some, "These three families are numbered with the very first standards of law and order on the banks of the White River."

Perhaps the three families stayed together until Jane's new son, John C.(Carter?) could be born January 8, 1816. The families then separated. George traveled north about three miles, crossed to the south side of White River, and settled opposite the south side of Piney Bayou at what is now known as Watkin's Bend.

His two small sons, Isaac and Addison, ages nine and seven, did all they could, but it was up to George to cut the timber and haul it to a clearing on the flat fertile bottomland near the river. Perhaps he and his two neighbors helped one another with the house raisings, in order to quickly get into some substantial shelter. Ten year old Tabitha helped her mother, and watched over four year old Mary and the toddling William. There George planted corn and a large garden, and continued to clear the land that he hoped to claim through the land office when one was established. During that time he preached regularly at Col. Stewart's log house.

On April 17, 1817, and again the next year, George was appointed territorial govenor to serve the large county of Lawrence as a Justice of the Peace. At the second appointment he was to serve four years. In 1817 his house was designated as the legal polling place. On June 24th settlers of the White River Township (present Izard Co., AK), came out of the woods and down the river to the Gill's log house to cast their ballots. George and Robert Livingston served as election judges.

About that time a treaty was made by the U.S. government with the Cherokee Indians, giving the Indians most of the Arkansas Ozarks, beginning with the southwest side of the White River. Although the Cherokees didn't move there, they allowed the Shawnees, under Chief Lewis (half brother to Tecumseh and the Prophet) to settle the land. The tribe, numbering about 2000, and under the protection of an American agent, divided into three settlements on the White River. One was at Livingston's place, one at Lunnin's place, and George Gill place.

When the Shawnees gathered at George's new farm, Jane, who was pregnant once again, may have panicked, pulled her little ones into the house and barred the door. George knew it was no use to oppose them, for they had legal rights to his land. He must have relived scenes from that dreadful night at Tippecanoe when he battled the Shawnees just a few years before. Now his was being taken by the Prophet's half brother, who had sided with the Americans during the War of 1812.

Leaving behind all his hard labor, he moved across the river and built a house near what is now known as the Whitehouse place about 1820. Once again he cleared land, and preached on the Sabbath. Two more sons were born there, his namesake-George Jr., and Silas Redmon.

After a few years in his new location on the north side of the White River, some time in the early 1820s, George decided to move once again, without claiming the land as his homesite. Instead, he probably scouted the lands to the south along the river, then loaded all his family's belongings on flatboats and floated down the White River to a fertile place he had chosen (about four or five miles northeast of present Batesville). This time he had found a place which felt right to him. It would be his home until the end of his days.

On October 12, 1825, George may have trimmed his "mutton chop" sideburns, donned his high-necked waistcoat, and tall beaver hat. Properly attired, he rode to the land office in Independence County, Arkansas Territory, which in 1819 had been separated from Missouri and had discarded its previous designation as Lawrence County. On that day George filed patents on two tracts of land.

On his land bordering the river, he built a fine two-story log house. It is said that farmers from a ten mile radius came to help raise the house, made from hewn logs one foot wide and deep. Jane must have smiled in anticipation. At last they would have an enduring home, a place to sink their wandering feet into. George built various out buildings, including barns and a smokehouse. East of the house a large orchard was set out, and crops of corn , cotton and tobacco were planted on the rich bottom-land along the river.

In 1826 George, and a fellow Baptist preacher named David Orr, busily rode a circuit, meeting for worship in the homes of the growing numbers of settlersin the wilderness area. They organized the Rehobeth Baptist Church that year, and continued preaching there three years later when it was meeting in the Vance community school house. It was then moved to Blue Creek, and finally to Moorefield. Rehobeth Church is the oldest existing Baptist Church in Arkansas

.

On Saturday, July 2,1831, George left his plantation and made the four mile ride to the courthouse in Batesville to join others to organize a Temperance Association of Independence County. Rev. George Gill was elected second vice-president. Often called "George the Scribe" he was a prolific writer of letters to

church papers, the local newspaper and his friends. Within the next few years George and Jane's three younger sons all married. Silas Redmon wed Rebecca Ann Harmon on July 9, 1842. John C. had married Pricilla Hankins in 1844, but after her death married Mary Elizabeth Brickey, daughter of Judge Hohn C. and Catherine Murry Brickey. On February 13, 1845, George III, married Margaret Luster. Although George did not officiate at most of his children's weddings, he performed many ceremonies for others in the 1830s and 40s.

From 1846 to 1848, George served as Independence County surveyor, exercising a side interest which appealed to him most of his life. During those years his circuit riding slowed and he spent more time on his homeplace, especially sharing his grief with Jane at the death of their son Isaac, who left two children and his widow "Betsy". In 1847, their youngest son Redmon also died, after giving them one grandson.

Grief continued to esculate for Jane when she realized that her husband George was ill, and would not recover. On a chilly spring day, March 11,1848, George lay in his high down-filled bed and died, surrounded by all his family in the log house he had built over a quarter of a century before.

Jane lived only 16 months after her husband's burial, breathing her last on August 16, 1849. Her coffin was probably placed beside George's although neither marker is visible. Others are buried there, and the small family plot came to be designated on maps as "Gill Cemetery".

(Above information has been copied from Twyla Gill Wright's,

"LATCHSTRINGS")

Possibly James Gill, son of William and Mary Anne Gill, and a nephew of George, is also buried here, since he reportedly died in Hot Springs, AR and also reportedly buried in Batesville, AR......EAG

More About JR. GEORGE GILL:

Burial: Independence Co., AR

Occupation: Baptist Preacher-farmer

Relative: G-gfather of Twyla Gill Wright?

More About GEORGE GILL and JANE CARTER:

Marriage: Abt. 1806, Hopkins Co., KY ?

Children of GEORGE GILL and JANE CARTER are:

20. i. TABITHA4 GILL, b. 1806, Hopkins Co., KY.

21. ii. ISAAC GILL, b. 1808, Hopkins Co., KY; d. 1841, Independence Co., AR.

22. iii. ADDISON GILL, b. September 18, 1809, Hopkins Co., KY; d. March 04, 1857, Independence Co., AR.

23. iv. MARY GILL, b. 1812, Indiana; d. July 11, 1876, Denton, TX.

v. WILLIAM GILL, b. 1814, Arkansas; d. April 04, 1837, After serving at Ft. Gibson in Indian Territory..

More About WILLIAM GILL:

Burial: Probably at Ft. Gibson, Indian Territory.

Parents (Facts Pg): s/George Gill, Jr.-Jane Carter

24. vi. JOHN CARTER GILL, b. January 08, 1816, Independence Co., AR; d. July 11, 1877, Batesville, Independence Co., AR.

25. vii. III GEORGE GILL III, b. 1818, Independence, Arkansas; d. August 07, 1853.

26. viii. SILAS REDMON GILL, b. 1821, Arkansas; d. 1847, Independence Co., Arkansas.

7. WILLIAM3 GILL (GEORGE2, THOMAS1 GILL?)1 was born September 14, 1777 in Chester Co., S. Carolina, and died July 15, 1844 in Sullivan Co., Ind. 66 years, 10 months, 1 day. He married MARY ANN MC REYNOLDS1 1801 in Rutherford Co., NC., daughter of JAMES MC REYNOLDS and UNKNOWN. She was born April 14, 1787 in Rockingham Co, N. Carolina, and died September 15, 1863 in Sullivan Co., IN 76 yeaars, 5 months, 1 day1.

Notes for WILLIAM GILL:

Marriage records, Rutherford Co., NC:

Gidney, Samuel S. /// Wells, Cynthia Jul 24, 1828 Robert Wells JM Arthur

Gidneys, Cornelus /// Bailey, Phebe Nov 15, 1835 John Borders E. Rippy

Giles, Jeremiah /// Dove, Milly Sep 14, 1784 Leonard Seeylor Felix Walker

Gilkey, John /// Logan, Cinthy May 31, 1821 James Cherry Isaac Craton

Gill, William /// McReynolds, Ann No Date Joseph Reynolds None ********************

Gillespie, James A. /// Ramsay, Jane M. Jan 27, 1836 James C. Cowan TF Birchett

Gillespie, James B. /// Scoggin, Mary B. Feb 12, 1859 C. Burnett None

William grew to manhood in SC, helped his father on the farm but apparently didn't show an interest in clockmaking. He did, however, show an avid interest in books and read at every opportunity. He was about 18 when his father died.

No deed records show the inheritance for son William nor for daughters Mary and Hannah. If Abraham and George Jr. received 200 acres each (being the eldest), and Joseph and Isaac 60 each, Mary (his mother) 180 acres, 100 would

be left. This would leave 60 for William, and perhaps 20 each for the daughters.

>From Twyla Gill Wrighjt's "Latchsytrings":

" In 1797, the large Gill clan gathered once more at the death of William's uncle, John Gill, in the 77th year of his age. His widow Sarah and his (John's) son William were to occupy the plantation. His other living children had families of their own. Mary and George Sr.'s son Abraham signed as a witness to John Gill's estate settlement. Over the next years many Gill babies were born into the large clan, and a proliferation of namesakes for George, John, James, Robert, William and Thomas could be found in Chester Co.

In 1800, Mary Gill still living in Chester C., SC., listed two white males, one in the age range 10-16 (Joseph) and the other 16-26 (George Jr.) and besides herself, listed two white females, one 10-16 years of age (Hannah), and the other 16-26 (Mary) with the census-taker. Her slaves numbered nine. William was probably married at that time.

She and the children in her household probably continued to attend Purity Presbyterian Church as communicants, and they must have been profoundly shocked when their pastor, Rev. Robert McCulloch, was charged with the sin of adultry. He was tried and found guilty and barred from the ministry.

In 1802 some of Mary Gill's discontented fellow communicants complained officially to the Presbytery listing their grievances. It is not known whether Mary was one of the discontented, or if she was more open with her thinking. About that time two of her sons, William and George Jr., began to talk of moving farther into the frontier and breaking new ground, seeing what was west of the piedmont where they had spent all of their lives. Several other Chester County farmers were interested in making a move. The far reaches of western Kentucky seemed a likely place to claim vacant land. Perhaps George Jr. had already gone scouting in Kentucky when he was 23 years old with an older neighbor, John Carter, in the summer of 1798. John Carter claimed land there at that time, and was known to live in Chester County, South Carolina. They returned to SC before making their final move.

Sometime between 1802 and 1804 George lifted his mother's trunks up onto a wagon, filled with bedding, clothing, linen-ware and keepsakes. She also packed several of her husband's books. They carried little furniture, but made certain they had all the simple tools they might need. William probably walked beside another wagon along with his wife Mary Anna, as he drove its oxen, and young Joseph (Josephus) rode along beside them. The girls may have ridden their own horses, properly seated in their side saddles.

Their wagons joined others, and Mary bid farewell to Abraham. It must have been a tearful parting, for Mary probably knew she would never see her oldest son and her grandchildren again. His three boys, Robert, Eli, and Josiah stood like stairsteps in front of her, and her namesake, little Mary,held to her hand. Perhaps baby Lucinda received a goodby kiss from her grandma.

They arrived at Fort Chiswell (present Wytheville, VA), and some miles farther west took a branch road which angled through the lower end of theClinch Mountains and across country by way of Crab Orchard, TN, toward Nashville. "It was by this road that settlers in a great portion of southwestern Kentucky came out." (The Wilderness Road. Speed p64)

This road toward Nashville was described in 1802 in a speech to the U.S. Senate: "Travelers pass through the country of the Cherokee Indians, nearly 100 miles over the Cumberland Mounbtains, exposed to every inclemency of the weather, without a shelter to retire to, for there is not a house nor hut in the whole journey, and all travelers...are liable at every step to be robbed by the Indians."

Some miles east of Nashville they took a road north. Just before reaching Gallatin they crossed the mighty Cumberland River and made their way northwest into Kentucky. They arrived in what was then called Christian County (present Henderson, Union, Webster and Hopkins Counties). As the Gills searched for rich, unclaimed land they found that the best had been reserved for claims by soldiers of the American Revolution Continential Line. Land warrants were issued to these soldiers, but a confusing volume of land laws were being passed, to supplement earlier acts, causing unclear title to many tracts. By November 30, 1805 Mary Gill had made her claim of 200 acres of vacant land which drained into Clear Creek in Henderson (later to be Hopkins) County."

After helping his brothers build their mother a cabin on Mary's land, William, in the company of possibly cousin Robert, and maybe brother, George, explored further north in Indiana Territory. Here, in what is now Sullivan County, William staked a claim. He was said to be the first white settler in what is now Gill Township located on what is now also know as "Gill's Prairie". This must have occurred sometime between 1805 and 1811. William Gill had built a block house, called the Gill Block House, on a strategic point that was used by Wm. Henry Harrison in the Tippecanoe Campaign in the fall of 1811 to guard the rear of his army while he was encamped at the Cottonwood Tree during the noon hour, Sept. 23, 1811 in his march toward the western part of Sullivan Co., IN. The rest of his army, including the cattle and hogs on feet with a militia guard for the same, followed by a troop of mounted scouts to pick up straglers, were encamped at that time along the then Rose Creek and as far south as this block house.

The block house was two stories high, the upper story projecting over the lower one on all sides, about 4 feet. The lower story was about 36 feet long north and south by 24 feet wide east and west with about 2 acres of land, surrounding the same, cleared and the whole enclosed with stockade timbers placed end ise about 10 to 12 feet high.

The exact site of this block house, afterward Fort Gill, was in the northwest 1/4 of the southeast 1/4 of Section 35, Township 7, Range 10 West in Gill Township, Sullivan Co., IN. Just southwest and across the Old Road there is the stump of a large elm tree that died and was cut down. It was under this tree that Dudley Mack fell off his horse and died after being wounded by the Indians at the time of the Dudley Mack Massacre on 15 Feb. 1815. He was buried early the next morning in what is now the Webb Cemetery. This was the first burial in that historic cemetery. It was here that William moved his family in 1811. It was here that my grandfather Gill, Joseph, was born.

At the time the block house was taken over and made a part of a system of fortification, it was enlarged, principally by increasing the amount of land included within the stockade and the same called Fort Gill. It is not known exactly what role William and Mary Anne played in the War of 1812 but both have American flags on their graves in Mt. Zion Cemetery.

William and Mary Anne ("Anna" as she is called in Indiana) were active in civic and religous affairs of the day. New Lebanon was one of the principal strongholds of Methodist Docterine and influence in western Indiana. It was the scene of camp meetings (held in block houses) that attracted worshipers from far and near....the pioneer settlers on Gill Prairie were only a little behind the people of Carlisle in organizing for Methodist worship. The block house of William Burnett was, so far as is known, the first place of worship for the Methodists of Gill Prairie. Rev. John Schrader had begun preaching here in 1813 and soon after a class was formed consisting of the following: William and Mary Burnett, WILLIAM and ANNA GILL, James Black and wife, Berry and Elizabeth Taylor, Deborah Graham, Catherine Strain and Patsy Hollenbach. According to records in the Vigo Co., Library, William and Mary Anna continued to be active in Methodism and conducted services in their block house and others on their circuit.

From MEET THE METHODISTS by Charles L. Allen, published in the Abingdon Press, Nasville:

"Francis Asbury became the leader of American Methodism. He was a genius at planning, and he had that amazing personality that caused his associates to quickly turn to him for leadership. We Methodists today need to remember the names of some of those early preachers: mighty evangelists like Edward Dromgoole, John Easter, and John Tunnell; scholarly preachers like WILLIAM GILL, John Dickens, and William Phoebus; pathfinders like John Smith, John Major, and Jeremiah Lambert; aggressive spirits like Jesse Lee, Freeborn Garrettson, Thomas Ware, Phillip Bruce, and Nelson Reed. These preachers not only penetrated frontiers and formed new churches and circuits, they were ecclesiastical architects who laid lasting foundations."

( The census of 1820 lists two (2) William Gill families living in Sullivan Co., IN., and are deemed to be cousins.....one family is that of William, son of John Gill and Sarah Duncan, married to Sarah Wallace; the other, as described above is the son of George Gill and Mary Lewis(?) and my great-grandparents. The early Gills were clannish and apparently stuck together......Note by E.A GILL )

Excerpts from and Obituary in The Carlisle News dated Sept. 30, 1921:

James Harvey Gill (grandson of William and Mary Anne GILL) " was born on the farm where his death occured on May 15, 1831, and was the son of James Gill, an early pioneer who entered the land from the government. Mr Gill had always lived on the farm where his birth occured and always followed the vocation of a farmer. He attended old Asbury University which is now DePauw, and taught school in Terre Haute and Vigo county for 12 years."

WILLIAM GILL,"He was a decendent of one of the earky pioneer families of the county, his grandfather, came to this section with his wife, Anna GILL, from South Carolina. He (meaning WILLIAM) had been educated at Wellmington (or could it have been Willington), SC, FOR MINISTRY IN THE Methodist Church. They were living at Ft. Knox as a protection against hostile Indians when General Harrison marched to the battle of Tippecanoe. William GILL being a member of his small army of sturdy pioneers. Mr. and Mrs. GILL lived for some time at Fort Ledgerwood, which stood on the present site of Carlisle. The Grand father was the first settler on what is known as Gill's Prairie, and the Prairie and township of GILL was named in his honor." ....................

>From Thomas Hayden GILL'S "Memories", written Jan. 1930:

"I think I should insert here a paragraph which would hardly come under the head of "Memories." Our family is of Scotch -Irish origin. The first definite account of our ancestors states that in the reign of Queen Anne, Thomas Gill emigrated from Scotland to Ireland and died there. His widow and five sons imigrated to America and settled in one of the Carolinas. Passing over the intervening years it will I think, be sufficient for my purpose to state that about the time of the organization of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church (I believe it was actually the Methodist Church...E. A. GILL), my grand father and grandmother, William Gill and Mary McReynolds were singing evangelists and met during the great revival that spread over several Southern States. Afterwards, they married and moved to Indiana and settled at a place known as "Gill's Prairie", There my father, Joseph Gill, was born... He was a typical Hoosier Schoolmaster, with experiences very similar to those of the hero of Eggleston's popular story by that name, though most of his teaching was done in the Ozarks of Southeast Missouri." (Note by Ed Gill..... I believe it was more likely Thomas' daughter, Ellen, who possibly married Hugh COOPER, rather than his widow, who came to America with her brothers.)

More About WILLIAM GILL:

Ancestral File Number: 61

Burial: Mt. Zion Methodist Burying Ground near New Lebanon or Merom.Sullivan Co., Ind.

Education: 1783, William, even at a tender age, found books especially interesting and handled them with reverent care during the times when he was given permission to hold them.

Occupation: Farmer-ggf Ed A. GILL

Parents (Facts Pg): s/George Gill, Sr.-Mary Lewis(?)

Record Change: November 13, 19991

Religion: Bet. 1800 - 1840, Active Methodist movement Honey Creek Circuit

Notes for MARY ANN MC REYNOLDS:

[McREYNOLDS.FTW]

p. 240, "McReynolds, a Noble Clan" by Wm. Howard McReynolds

Rutherford Co. marriage index we find the following information:

Ann McReynolds to William Gill (no bond date). Bondsmen and witnesses:

Thos White & Joseph Mc Reynolds.

Name Mary Anne Mc REYNOLDS

Sex: F

Born Apr-14-1787 NO Carolina

Baptized

Died Sep-15-1863 Sullivan Co., Ind.

Buried Mt Zion Cem. New Lebanon, Gill's Prairie, Ind.

Other

Ref 975

Occupation

Husband: William GILL

>From notes in Thomas Hayden GILL'S "Memories" written January 1930:

"I think I have mentioned elsewhere in this narrative that my grandparents, on my father's side, had both been quite active in church work before their marriage; but at the time of this story they were living quietly on a farm in Indiana. My grandmother had won something of a reputation as a nurse and also as a deeply spiritual woman, capable of counseling and praying with anyone in mental distress. So it came about that she was called to the bedside of what was reputed to be a very wicked woman. After my grandmother had been with her for a considerable time, praying with and for her, she died without making any profession of religion or conversion. On the night this woman died, my grandfather, knowing the end was near, had gone over to bring my grandmother home. On the way home---they were walking, as it was only a short distance--my grandfather noticed there was something going on in the mind of my grandmother that he did not know anything about. He also noticed that she kept crowding over against him so he could hardly keep her in the path. All at once she clapped her hands and exclaimed: 'Didn't you see that?'

'See what?' said he.

'Why it was the Devil, himself. He has had his face right up in mine all the way, telling me I am a fool; that my religion is all foolishness; that I have been praying and doing everything I could to get her saved, and still she has been lost. I stood it as long as I could, then I just told him: 'Get thee behind me , Satan,' and he just flew. Didn't you see him?"

"From then on, my grandmother was so happy that my grandfather could hardly keep her in the road."

"I do not wish to comment on this, except to say: My impression is the beliefs of our grandparents were very intense, and their experiences very vivid. I wish that we might get back some of that vividness."

.

T

More About MARY ANN MC REYNOLDS:

Ancestral File Number: 61

Burial: Mt. Zion Methodist Burying Ground near New Lebanon, Gill's Prairie, Ind.

Record Change: November 13, 19991

More About WILLIAM GILL and MARY McREYNOLDS:

Marriage: 1801, Rutherford Co., NC.

Children of WILLIAM GILL and MARY MC REYNOLDS are:

27. i. JAMES4 GILL, b. December 18, 1804, Kentucky; d. August 11, 1871, Hot Springs, AR ENROUTE HOME FROM TEXAS.

28. ii. GEORGE NELSON GILL, b. May 15, 1807, Kentucky; d. May 08, 1866, Home of his mother, Mary Anne GILL, Sullivan Co., IN.

29. iii. MATILDA GILL, b. November 24, 1809, Probably KY; d. January 09, 1860, Sullivan Co., IN.

30. iv. DRUCILLA GILL, b. February 16, 1811, KY; d. January 10, 1844, Probably Illinois.

v. MARY GILL, b. August 31, 1814, Indiana Territory; d. September 10, 1814, Indiana Territory.

31. vi. JOSEPH GILL, b. December 15, 1815, Territory of Indiana; now Sullivan Co.; d. November 01, 1895, Dent Co., MO of pneumonia.

vii. ISAAC WATTS GILL, b. June 07, 1818, Territory of Indiana; d. February 14, 1899, Home Silas & Mary Gill Sherrell DentCo..

Notes for ISAAC WATTS GILL:

Isaac reportedly lived with the Indians for many years and was known as a "Squaw Man"

More About ISAAC WATTS GILL:

Burial: Dent Co., MO E. of Salem

Occupation: "Squaw Man"lived w/Indian

Parents (Facts Pg): Son William Gill & Mary Anna McReynolds

32. viii. MARGARET MCREYNOLDS GILL, b. December 13, 1820, Sullivan Co., Indiana; d. March 28, 1844, Montgomery Twp., Owen Co., IN.

ix. MARY JANE GILL, b. March 30, 1824, Sullivan Co., Indiana; d. April 09, 1824, Sullivan Co., Indiana, age 10 days.

More About MARY JANE GILL:

Parents (Facts Pg): Dau. William Gill & Mary Anna McReynolds

8. ISAAC NEWTON3 GILL (GEORGE2, THOMAS1 GILL?) was born 1780 in Chester Co., SO Carolina, and died 1834 in Henderson Co., KY. He married ANN CAROLINE SWITZER EVANS January 03, 1814 in Charleston S.C., daughter of JOHN RUDOLPH SWITZER. She was born Abt. 1795 in Charleston, SC, and died February 26, 1839 in the 44th year of her age, Henderson Co., Ky.

Notes for ISAAC NEWTON GILL:

Young Isaac Newton Gill was probably his father's shadow in the clock shop, always watching how he put the pieces together, asking questions. It mus have been a delight to George Gill Sr. to realize that his son was a true artisan who wished to follow in his father's footsteps. Isaac probably served an apprenticeship under his father, and grew particularly fond of constructing watches, which was a rather unusual specialty, since most small timepieces were imported from Europe.

Isaac learned to coil springs of tempered steel. cut gears, make dials of enamel and metal, work with jewels and produce or purchase inner and outer cases of tin, silver and gold. After a watch was completed Isaac may have placed a small circular piece of fabric or paper between the cases to keep the outer case firmly closed and protect the works from dust. Sometimes he got his mother to embroidery these cloths with fine needlework, thereby making sentimental treasures to be given away by the buyer. On the watchpapers, he and his father may have printed their names and location in an elaborate design to advertise their work.

Isaac received a tract of 60 acres from his father's estate situated on Rocky Creek adjacent Pagan and James H. Walker, dec'd.

About 1797 Isaac Gill packed his watchmaking tools, waved goodbye to his family, and headed down the Charleston Road. Joseph must have felt an immense loss of Isaac, for as a nine year old he was just beginning to learn the rudiments of watch making from his older brother.

Ahead of Isaac lay an exciting future in the charming port city, the cultural center of the state. By the winter of 1798 he had established himself in his trade, perhaps as a journeyman under Bethel Threadcraft. On December 28th of that year he signed his name "Isaac N. Gill" as a witness in a marriage settlement between a silversmith, Charles P. Butler, and Ann Poyas, with Mr. Threadcraft, a watchmaker, signing as a trustee.

In 1804, Isaac married a gentle young woman, who was quite literate, named Ann Caroline Evans. The Charleston Times carried their wedding announcement on January 5, 1804, "Married on Tuesday evening last (Jan. 3) by the Rev. Doct. Furman, Mr. Isaac Gill to Miss Ann Evans, both of this city." Isaac busily made his timepieces, and possibly had watch-papers engraved or lithographed in elaborate designs to advertise his shop. He also took out advertisements in Charleston directories from 1807 through 1816 as "Isaac Gill, watchmaker."

Isaac's artisan love of watchmaking, and inventiveness, led him to

experiment, to create and patent a special piece, which he called, "Marine Timekeeper." He received notification of his patent, number 1194X, dated January 15, 1810, at his home in Charleston, SC.

On May 2, 1815, Isaac Gill "watchmaker, of Charleston, SC" gave a land deed to William Stringfellow of Chester County for 60 acres of land "situated on Rockey Creek and adjacent the land of Pagan and James Walker...being my part of the lands of my father, George Gill, dec'd."

Isaac began a family in Charleston, and enjoyed the beauty of the brick architecture of the city. Perhaps he and Ann took strolls up Meeting Street to view the newly constructed three-story house built in the Adam style by merchant Nathaniel Russell before 1809. By the turn of the next decade, 1820, he had made a drastic decision. They would move to Kentucky and join his mother and brothers.

What a joy it must have been when Mary heard a wagon approaching her house. Her old eyes could hardly believe the sight. It was Isaac and Ann Caroline and their children!! It had been 15 years since she had seen them.

Isaac bought corner lot # 62 in the town of Madisonville from Thomas Cardwell which lay east of William R. McGary's lot. Immediately he hired men to help him build a brick home and workshop on it. It was a fine addition to the budding town, and an excellant location for his watchmaking business, since it stood directly across the street from the northeast corner of the public square. At some point he also acquired lot 61 & lot 60. As 1825 drew to a close, Isaac probably made more frequent trips out to the farmhouse of his mother. She was quite feeble, but was well cared for by her slave Hetty, and daughter Hannah, who lived near by. On December 15, while winter winds moaned around the log house, and a fire burned on the hearth, Mary's long life flickered and went out.

At the grave site on the back side of her property, Hannah and Richard, their children, and Isaac and Ann Caroline, along with friends and neighbors, watched her wooden coffin lowered by ropes into the cold winter ground. At the heard of her grave, the family later placed a fine tombstone, its top curved in a decorative arch. On it was inscribed: Memory of Mary Gill, Died Dec 15 1825, Aged 80 years. (Many years later Rose Creek cemetery grew up, enclosing her grave within it. Her tombstone is still standing)

That summer, in June, Isaac decided that Ann Caroline needed more help with the house and growing children, so he bought from John Ashley a thirteen year Negro girl known by the name of Eliza. He paid $530 of the paper of the Bank of the Commonwealth of Kentucky for her and her future increase.

By 1830 Isaac had decided for some reason to relocate, and moved his family north to the town of Henderson in Henderson County. There he bought a town lot and once again set about making watches and clocks. Four years later he made out his will on July 25th, 1834, perhaps due to ill health. In it he gave to his "beloved wife Ann C. Gill a house and lot in the town of Madisonville, and my real estate whatsoever..all my estate real, personal, and mixed. I appoint my said wife sole executrix of this my last will and testament...and desire that she may not be compelled to give security...but merely return an inventory of the goods and chattle received by her as my executrix. And I desire my said wife may consult James Rouse my friend as to the management of her affairs." Shortly thereafter he died and his will was proven in court that same year.

Two years later Ann Caroline sold lots 61 and 62 "including the brick house built by the late Isaac Gill, deceased," to James Bishop, Samuel Woodson and Orlean Bishop, merchants and partners " Bishop and Woodson and Company" of Madisonville. They paid her $800 for the choice piece of real estate. A month later, August 1836, she bought from Frances and Lydia Lockett a portion of lot 52, bordering on Second or Locust Street in Henderson for $170.

In January 1839 Ann Caroline Gill, still living in Henderson, sold the remaining lot in Madisonville, lot 60, to George Noel for $50. On that same day Jan 9th, she also made out her will.

"...It is my will and desire that my house and lot situated in the town of Henderson, State of Kentucky, in which I now reside, remain unsold and be occupied and used as a residence by my three daughters Mary E. Barnard, Eliza G. Gill and Maria Louisa Gill free of rent until my youngest daughter, Maria, shall arrive at the age of twenty one years. Then it is my wish and desire that my said executor sell the house and lot...and that all money of my estate be put out on interest which will then be appropriated to the maintenance and education of my two youngest daughters Eliza and Maria. I do give and bequeath my beds and bed clothes to my two daughters Eliza and Maria to be equally divided between them.

I do give and bequeath to Archibald Dixon of the county and town of

Henderson in trust for my daughter Mary E. Barnard a small musical clock made by my husband Isaac Gill. And of the money arising from the sale of my said property when the whole of it shall be sold, I give and bequeath two fifths of the sum to two sons William Y. Gill and Joseph L. Gill to be equally divided between them... The other three fifths I give to Archibald Dixon in trust for the use and benefit of my three daughters (their interest in the same to be equal)." Her friends L.W. Powell and Elizabeth McBride signed as witnesses. By the August 1839 court term she was dead and her will was then proven. (All of the above information was condensed from Twyla Gill Wright's "LATCHSTRINGS" published in 1987)

June 1804 married Tuesday evening by Rev. Dr. Furman, Mr. Isaac Gill (son of George Gill) to Miss Ann B. Evans, both of Charleston. From Marriage and Death Notices from the Charleston Times 1800, 21, page 16.

(info taken from rootsweb.com)

Isaac Newton Gill, Chester Co, SC born 1780 in SC. Death: 1834 in Henderson Co., KY Occupation: Clockmaker-Silversmith married: Ann Caroline Evans in 1804 in Henderson KY? would have been about 30 when Isaac was born in 1810 Announcement in Charleston Times: June 4, 1804 married Tuesday Evening by Rev. Dr. Furman,Mr. Isaac Gill (son of George Gill) to Miss Ann B. Evans, both of Charleston SC." Marriage 1 Ann Caroline EVANS b: ABT 1793 in Chester, Charleston, SC Married: 3 JAN 1814 in Charleston S.C.

1. Bef. 1834 Mary E. BARNARD in SC?

2. Bef. 1834 Eliza G. GILL in SC?

3. Bef. 1834 Maria Louisa GILL in SC?

4. Bef. 1834 William Y. GILL b: in SC or Henderson KY

5. Bef. 1834 Joseph L. GILL in SC or Henderson KY

A mystery is why were Thomas and Isaac in Lincoln Co NC in 1840? And where were they all in 1830. Isaac Newton Gill reportedly did not die until 1834 and Isaac and Thomas were most likely married by then, Samuel was born in 1836. The township in NC was Lower Regiment, which may or may not allude to a military installment. I do know that Thomas Guideon's children were born there and that Samuel Thomas Lists his father as being born in SC and his birthplace as North Carolina. I hope to solve the NC connection somehow. The following is a conundrum that stumps us all: (This Isaac GILL was dead in 1840...EAG)

More About ISAAC NEWTON GILL:

Moved: Bet. 1819 - 1820, Henderson, KY

Occupation: Clockmaker-Silversmith

Parents (Facts Pg): s/George GILL, Sr.-Mary LEWIS

Notes for ANN CAROLINE SWITZER EVANS:

The following death notice appeared in the "CHARLESTON OBSERVER" issue of April 20, 1839:

"Departed this life at Henderson, Kentucky, on the 26th day of Feb. in the 44th year of her age, Ann Caroline Gill, daughter of the late John Rudolph Switzer of this city."

EAG note: It would appear that Ann Caroline was married briefly to an EVANS, since her father's name was SWITZER.

F.O. Clark gives a marriage date of June 4, 1804, by Rev. Dr. Furman, for Ann B. EVANS and Isaac GILL, son of George GILL, as quoted in the Charleston Times, 1800, 21, page 16 .

Marriage Notes for ISAAC GILL and ANN EVANS:

Marriage records indicate that Ann Caroline's Maiden name was SWITZER or else she had been married before to a SWITZER (Source NC & SC marriages)

More About ISAAC GILL and ANN EVANS:

Marriage: January 03, 1814, Charleston S.C.

Children of ISAAC GILL and ANN EVANS are:

i. MARY E.4 BARNARD, b. Abt. 1814; m. JAMES WILLIAMS, May 23, 1833, Henderson Co., KY.

More About MARY E. BARNARD:

Relative: Probably a step daughter of Isaac N.

More About JAMES WILLIAMS and MARY BARNARD:

Marriage: May 23, 1833, Henderson Co., KY

ii. ELIZA G. GILL, b. Bef. 1834.

More About ELIZA G. GILL:

Parents (Facts Pg): d/Isaac Newton GILL-Ann Caroline EVANS

iii. WILLIAM Y. GILL, b. Bef. 1834, Charleston, SC, or Hopkins Co., KY.

More About WILLIAM Y. GILL:

Parents (Facts Pg): s/Isaac N. GILL-Ann Caroline EVANS

iv. JOSEPH L. GILL, b. Bef. 1834, Charleston, SC or Hopkins Co., KY.

More About JOSEPH L. GILL:

Parents (Facts Pg): s/Isaac N. GILL-Ann Caroline EVANS

v. MARIA LOUISA GILL, b. Bef. 1834.

Notes for MARIA LOUISA GILL:

Ann Caroline: It is my will and desire that my house and lot situated in the town of Henderson State of Ky ...remain unsold and used as a residence by my three daughters Mary E Barnard, Eliza G. Gill and Maria Lousia Gill rent free until my youngest daughter Maria shall arrive at the age of twenty one years.

More About MARIA LOUISA GILL:

Parents (Facts Pg): d/Isaac N. GILL-Ann Caroline EVANS

Will: January 1839, Ann Caroline: See notes...

9. HANNAH3 GILL (GEORGE2, THOMAS1 GILL?) was born 1785 in Chester Co., SO Carolina, and died Bef. March 1863 in Hopkins Co., KY. She married RICHARD S. GRAHAM Bef. 1810 in Hopkins Co., KY, son of HUGH METHVEN GRAHAM. He was born 1772 in Belfast, North Ireland, and died Bef. 1838 in Probably Hopkins Co., KY.

Notes for HANNAH GILL:

Hannah married an enterprising young farmer named Richard S. Graham, who seemed to understand legal matters unusually well. In Hopkins County, KY Richard grew ill. Knowing his death was approaching, he made out his will on January 18, 1838. His property was fairly extensive, including 10 slaves. He died before July, for his will was proven in court at that time. In it he divided

his estate between his wife Hannah and their seven children:

Harvey was to have the tanyard and its property.

Paulina Peyton, Alzada (Alice), and Elmina were each to receive a horse and a new saddle and bridle, the latter two when they reached age 21 or were married.

Cyrus and Leroy were to receive the rest of the land.

At the death of Hannah, or her remarriage, their 7 daughters including Paulina, Alzada, Elmina, Miranda, Olivia, Zereldah and Elvira were to receive equal parts the estate which would equal that given to their brothers. (Evidently he felt that daughters were as important heirs as sons). The youngest children, Cyrus, Leroy and Elvira, were to be educated with money from the estate. At Hannah's death Harvey was to be allowed to buy the slave Peter, and Paulina was to have a girl slave, which would not be subject to Paulina's husband. Richard specified that, "If my slaves should prove disobedient to my wife, they were to be hired out or sold." Orlean Bishop witnessed the will.

Hannah lived on at their farm, never remarying. By 1850 her daughter Zereldah, who married Moses Clift, died, and her two children, nine year old Junius R. and five year old Hannah S. were living with their grandmother Hannah. Leroy Graham was then 24 and was a farmer, still living with his mother. Alice was just 17. Hannah must have taken in a boarder for Raphael Rinchamer, a 30 year old German shoemaker was living in her household. Her son Harvey had a fine tanning business and, with his wife Mary, lived just a short distance from his mother's farm with their three young sons and tiny baby daughter.

Ten years later, in 1860, Hannah's real estate was worth $7000, and her personal property was valued at $10,000, a sizeable amount for that time and region. Her son Cyrus, who was a school teacher, and his wife Marion, and their eleven year old son Theodore were then living with her near Nebo.

Elmira Graham Parker, and her daughter Hannah, age 13, were also in Hannah's household. That year the census recorder listed "Harriet Givens, 10, a mulatto" as living with Hannah, but not as a slave. Perhaps Hannah had given her a home and work. The girl may have been the offspring of a slave and a man in the James or John Givens family who had lived in that area for several decades.

By March 1863 Hannah Gill Graham had died, the last of Mary and George Gill's children. She was 78 years old, and did not leave a will. The court divided her rather large estate:

Cyrus Graham received lot #1, containing 371 acres, including some o Mary Gill's original survey.

Leroy Graham received lot #2, containing 321 acres.

Harvey Graham received lot #3, containing 450 acres (part of Mary Gill's survey), the old mansion and tanyard.

Paulina Graham Peyton was given the slave Malissa and $1,407.

Moses Clift, in right of his wife Zerelda, received the slave Silva and cash.

J.C. & Hannah S. Clift (children of Zereldah) $1005.

Elmira Graham Parker was given the slave Charles and $1473.

Elvira Graham Harris received the slave Lucinda and $1452.

Oliva Graham Baker was given the slave Luisa and $1464.

Harvey, Leroy, and Cyrus were to pay to Paulina the amount awarded her from the estate.

At a public sale on March 12, 1863 her farm items were sold, which

included four horses, many cattle, hogs, 20 sheep, 15 geese, and 70 chickens, along with farm equipment, stored corn, fodder, and a crop of tobacco (which brought $186.) Her daughters bought all her table linen and stoneware and wooden dishes.

Elmira purchased the dining table, Cyrus the cupboard and wagon and wheat fan. The writing desk was sold, and dozens of other items, including 400 pounds of new bacon, one trough of lard, a loom and flax wheel, and candle snuffers. A number of notes owed by neighbors and family members were collected.

Hannah may have been buried beside her husband, Richard S. Graham, in Rose Creek cemetery, but their tombstones are no longer visible.

Several of their descendants, and those of Mary Gill Bishop, Isaac Gill and perhaps William Gill, continued to live in or near Hopkins County, KY. Other Gills, particularly a James Gill (who may have been a nephew of George Sr.), appeared there on Rose Creek property by 1859. Toward the close of the century one of Jame's sons, William B. Gill, donated land to be included in Rose Creek cemetery.

More About HANNAH GILL:

Burial: Probably Rose Creek Ce.,Hopkins Co., KY

Parents (Facts Pg): d/George GILL Sr.-Mary LEWIS(?)

More About RICHARD S. GRAHAM:

Burial: PROBABLY Rose Creek Cem., Hopkins Co., KY

Occupation: Farmer with a legal mind

More About RICHARD GRAHAM and HANNAH GILL:

Marriage: Bef. 1810, Hopkins Co., KY

Children of HANNAH GILL and RICHARD GRAHAM are:

33. i. HARVEY4 GRAHAM, b. 1808, Hopkins Co., KY.

34. ii. PAULINA GRAHAM, b. 1810, Hopkins Co., KY; d. Aft. 1860, See note.

iii. ALZADA (ALICE) GRAHAM, b. November 07, 1811, Hopkins Co., KY; d. January 1841, Hopkins Co., KY.

More About ALZADA (ALICE) GRAHAM:

Burial: Hopkins Co., KY

Parents (Facts Pg): Dau Richard S. Graham & Hannah Gill

35. iv. ELMINA GRAHAM, b. October 27, 1815, Hopkins Co., KY; d. August 23, 1899, Hopkins Co., KY.

v. MIRANDS GRAHAM, b. Bet. 1815 - 1820, Hopkins Co., KY; d. Hopkins Co., KY.

36. vi. OLIVIA GRAHAM, b. 1823, Hopkins Co., KY.

37. vii. ZERELDA GRAHAM, b. October 07, 1823, Hopkins Co., KY; d. July 15, 1848, Hopkins Co., KY.

38. viii. LEROY GRAHAM, b. 1826, Hopkins Co., KY.

39. ix. CYRUS GRAHAM, b. 1827, Hopkins Co., KY.

40. x. ELVIRA GRAHAM, b. 1830, Hopkins Co., KY.

10. JOSEPHUS (JOSEPH)3 GILL (GEORGE2, THOMAS1 GILL?) was born October 31, 1789 in Chester Co., SO Carolina, and died March 09, 1855 in Benton Co., MO. He married MARTHA BROWDER October 24, 1816 in Hopkins Co., KY, daughter of ISHAM BROWDER and RACHEL SLADEN. She was born September 14, 1795 in Hopkins Co., KY, and died April 13, 1877 in Benton Co., MO.

Notes for JOSEPHUS (JOSEPH) GILL:

When Joseph and Martha were married, she was 21 and he was 27. A little over a year after marriage Joseph sold to Woodford Jones 50 acres, which were located on the waters of Rose Creek, for $100. On Nov. 26, 1818 he bought a 50 acre tract on Rose Creek which his brother George owned, for $70. This transaction was carried through the mail, since George was, "..of Lawrence Co., Missouri Territory."

In 1819, Joseph and Martha decided to leave Kentucky. They bid farewell to his mother, and excitedly headed for Howard Co., Missouri Territory. Just 15 years before, the area had been acquired by the U.S. government as part of the Louisiana Purchase.

According to a Howard County history Joseph, along with other settlers of the county, claimed land there that spring. However, a letter written by Martha's father, Ishram Browder, in Hopkins C., KY in 1822 states"...your sister Gill wishes you to write..to direct your letter to the post office Bloomfield, Ray Co. Mr. Joseph Gill is postmaster at that place...and writes that they have had a very wet season, so much so that people had planted their corn the 11th of June."

They settled in the area where the town of Fayette was laid out in 1823. A salt works had been established near there, and a grist and saw mill had been built in 1819, just a few miles away at Old Franklin on the mighty Missouri River. In 1824 a brick court house was built in Fayette, and a small hotel stood on the southeast corner of the public square. A businessman had begun selling goods from his log house nearby.

When the town was incorporated by the county court in November 1826, Joseph Gill was named one of the five original trustees. Two other trustees were the first school teacher, an Irishman who taught classes in his log cabin, and Dr. Samuel Crews, one of the two community physicians.

For $25.25 Joseph and Martha bought town lots 146 and 110 from Fayette's Superintendent of the Courthouse and Jail on Feb. 14, 1827. The transaction was witnessed by Joseph's friend Dr. Crews. Perhaps Joseph built his home on lot 110. As a watchmaker like his father and his brother, he set about establishing his business.

On August 27, 1829, four years after his mother's death, "Joseph Gill of Howard Co., State of Missouri, for diverse and good causes and considerations, me hereunto moving, have made and authorized Sam Woodson Esq. my lawful attorney to ask for and receive from Richard Graham of Hopkins County, part of the estate of Mary Gill, all sums of money whatsoever due and owing me as one of the legatees, I authorize my attorney to sell all my rights to two Negroes of said estate: Peter and Hetty to the purchaser." Evidently his brother-in-law had not settled the estate by this time, and Joseph felt the need to pressure him.

In 1830 the town of Fayette was re-incorporated, and Joseph was once again asked to serve on its board of trustees, along with one other of the original trustees. Two years later he bought 38 acres, described as part of the west 1/2 of the southeast 1/4 of section 34, range 16, township 51, for $100. Then in a smart business move, he paid Mary Simpson for a small business lot, 119, fronting the town square, measuring 15' across the front, directly southwest from the courthouse.

He and Martha acquired 18 more acres in Sept. 1833, which bordered their rural acreage to the south, from James Howell $100. (Presently just outside of town near D.C. Rogers Lake on highway 5.) Then in 1839 the Gills started selling their property. Lot 119, facing the public square, was sold to Thomas Ray for $200, which was a nice profit, or it may have included a building which housed his watch shop. In March of that same year they sold their 18 acres to Reuben Johnson for a sizeable amount: $900. By the next year they registered ownership of two slaves, a woman and man.

While still living in Howard Co., Joseph, or Josephus as he was now often called (even on legal records), traveled to Benton Co., MO and bought 80 acres from James McFarland on October 27, 1840. It was described as the east 1/2 of the northeast 1/4 of section 9, township 40, range 22, and lay about two miles northeast of the small town of Warsaw, 35 miles south of Sedalia (presently on Lake of the Ozarks). He paid $420 for the acreage.

In 1842 the Gill family packed up and left for their new home near Warsaw, Benton Co., MO, some 100 miles to the southwest. Zereldah was then a young lady and of much help to Martha as they set up housekeeping on their farm, while ten year old Mary assisted. Edwin and Elbert helped with the stock and farming. Nine year old Thomas and six year old Ira had a delightful time getting acquainted with the creeks and hideaway spots on the farm. Three year old William toddled after them.

Two years later Warsaw and the nation were engaged in a presidential election, with Henry Clay running against James K. Polk. "The Warsaw Democrats had tied a rooster on the roof of the courthouse a few days before the election, and every morning this rooster was to crow for Polk and Dallas." A noted Warsaw lawyer went to some of the older boys from Whig supporting families, including young Thomas Gill, and secretly got them to tie a large racoon on the roof the night before the election. "The next morning, there was no crowing, but a lot of feathers were flying about." The lack of a rooster's crow didn't decide the outcome of the election however, for James Knox Polk won.

The next year, after the crops were brought in, Josephus and Martha made a trip back to Fayette. On the afternoon of October 20, 1845, they sold lot 146 to Joseph Carey for $55. In order to help their son Edwin set up his business as a "Tinner" in Warsaw, Josephus loaned him $200, and Edwin signed a promissory note on April 12, 1849, promising to pay that sum back, plus 6% interest.

By 1850 Josephus registered his age on the census record as 61, his birthplace as SC, his occupation as watchmaker and his property value at $2100.

Josephus continued to prosper on his farm, where his watchmaking business was probably carried on from a workshop in his home. In 1852 he and Martha made their last trip back to Fayette, where "Josephus Gill of Benton Co.," sold lot 110 to Catherine Marley for $475. It probably included the house they built there over 20 years before. Three years later the new owner died from an epidemic of cholera.

Realizing that he wasen't getting any younger, and wanting to ensure his family a proper division of his worldly goods, Josephus made his will on May 23, 1853, designating his wife Martha and son Edwin R. as executors. On March 9. 1855, Josephus died and his will was probated the next month.

"I give and bequeathe to my beloved wife Martha Gill all my lands, together with my dwelling house and all my household furniture...for and during her natural life to be disposed of as she may think proper. Also my large Music Box, all my stock of horses and all my work oxen with four milk cows, all my sheep and all my hogs.

I give to my eldest daughter Zereldah Gill of Henderson, KY the sum of $100, she already having received $100. To my eldest son Edwin R. Gill I give the sum of $200. To my son Elbert J. Gill I give the sum of $200. To my son Thomas Gill I give the sum of $180, he having already received $20. To my son Ira Gill I give the sum of $200, to be paid him when he arrives at the age of 21 years. To my youngest son William T. Gill I give the sum of $200 to be paid him when he arrives at the age of 21 years, also my fine "Silver Watch and Rifle gun." To my daughter Mary Gill I give the sum of $200 to be left in the hands of my wife, whom I will to be her guardian as long as she may think proper...Lastly, I will that my two Negro slaves Jerry and Lucy be hired to good masters, until the money arising from said hire amounts to the sum of $654 clear from expenses in the premises, then both of said slaves to be set free, agreeably to the law of the State in that case, and said slaves then I will shall be free."

Above taken from Twyla Gill Wright's "Latchstrings"

Letter from Josephus Gill:

July 12, 1847 Black Oak Grove, near Warsaw, MO

My very dear children. Your letter dated 20 June has come safe to hand, sometime since, and I would have written to you immediately, agreably to your request, but at the time of its reception, I was confined to my bed by sickness, and have had a very narrow escape, but through the blessing of the Lord I have recovered once more, and am at present nearly well.

My disease was an infection of the breast, called by the doctors Neumonia I believe. I was my own physician. I never send for a doctor. There is not one of them in ten, but what is after your money if they had that they do not careif you weare in the bottom of the sea.

If I had callled the doctor to every case in my familyas some are in the practice of doing I am prettysure I would at this time have been in poverty and perhaps half of my family in their graves. did you ever know a doctor that took a physic? The rest of the family enjoy excellent health at present, are all working finely on the farm Your Motherand Elbert having the whole concern of it. I have nothing to do with it at all. You never saw a prettier crop and if ??? than they have got (at present) in your life but prospects may be blasted by drouth; and a curious striped bug, has appeared in this neighborhood, threatening to destroy the coming crop. We know not what tomorrow may bring. forth. I follow my old occupation walk to town, in the morning after breakfast, work at my business all day and return home at night, thus walking five miles every day, and saving what I make in the shop clear of incombance.

Your Mother wishes me to answer your enquiries, which I will do with great pleasure, as far as in my power. Our friends in Fayette, were all well a few days since. Kincheloe is still at College improving rapidly. Preaches sometimes universally beloved and respected. Your old friends the Wilsons, are all gone to sticks. the girls have behaved too bad for you to hear of it. A. Morrison has got rich. Cousin Minera is so fat she can hardly walk. J. Jackson getting along in the usual way without variation. Cousin Prior married a rich relation and is living near his fathersdoing well as to the world. I can think of nothing more to write you from that quater. Nancy Burnett is well, doing very well and is the mother of two fine boys.

I saw Br Browder on yesterday, he was in fine health, and said the family were all well. His two oldest boys Wm. and James are in the army st Sante Fee.

Thus my dear children, we are tossed about by the waves of this ocean world which we at present live in, every thing repeatedly changing and nothing permanent ought we not to be wise, and timely secure life preservers to ?????? when our vessel goes to pieces. A storm will burst on ????? earth of ours some of hese daysand truly destroy it this is true as heaven

"Amazing period! when each mountain height

Out burns Vesuvius; rocks eternal pour

Their melted mass, as rivers once they poured

Stars rush; and final ruin fiercely drives

Her plough share o'er creation!

See God's words to us poor mortals, 2, Peter 3.7,10 2, Thes.1.7,8,9.

Yes my dear children, we are here in this world, and if we are in our proper senses, we know that it is a world of trouble, change and death, and we are compelled to believe, our Maker, the good being will change it at last, and us too, and make each permanent and He has not left us to grope our way in the dark in this matter no, no, the constant student of the writings of those inspired men, whom he commissioned to speak his own words to us, knows He has given us, the necessary information we must be "born again" born of water, and born of the Holy Spirit and this Spirit must abide in us until death, in orderto help our infirmities it giving us power, to resist temtation, comforting us in all our earhly troubles, by inspiring us with hope and must be our PASPORT into the new earth and heavens, which will be formed from the present, when dissolved by fire; and which will be unchangeable, lasting eternally this is heaven those of us, who are admitted; have eternal life. (The nonadmittance into this new earth and heavens, is hell.) The resurrection is a doctrine continually in the mind of the great Apostle to us gentiles; Paul, (but do the preachers of our day ever mention it?) this is the mighty truth which the Apostle strives to make us understand ?izthe making our ???? alive again after we die, that we may enjoy, with our revived Lord, in that new Paradise a life that will neither change nor end. "For, if the Spirit of him who raised up Jesus from the dead, dwell in you; he who raised up Christ from the dead, will ever make even your mortal bodies alive, through (by) his Spirit who dwells in you." Rom.8.11, Dear children, your earthly father exhorts you most fervantly, to pray at least every day, to your heavenly father, for the Holy Spirit, that it may abide in you to the day of eternity. Adieu

All the family send their best love to you and your little Isabell rest assured of my constant prayers for your present and eternal happiness. Amen.

I remain your ever affectionate father

Josephus GILL

Wm. T. (or G?.) & Zerelda Gill)

----------------------------------------------------------------

There is an Isabelle Gill in the Newport, N. Ky, Campbell co.

census for 1900. Is this the Isabelle mentioned???

More coming

Connie Adams-Pitt

Sunny Califorina

90 421 Feb 1874 Gill minors Ira Gill, G&C ---

92 438 Dec 28, 1904 Gill, Ira Official bond ---

90 405 Jan 1853 Gill, J. Martha & E. R. Gill, Exrs. ---

90 424 --- Gill, Mary --- ---

1850 CENSUS BENTON CO., MO:

313b 11 Gill Edwin R. 26 Missouri pg0306a.txt

311a 10 Gill Ira 13 Missouri pg0306a.txt

311a 6 Gill Josephus 61 South Carolina pg0306a.txt

311a 7 Gill Martha 54 Kentucky pg0306a.txt

311a 8 Gill Mary 18 Missouri pg0306a.txt

314a 11 Gill Sally 36 Kentucky pg0306a.txt

311a 9 Gill Thomas 15 Missouri pg0306a.txt

311a 11 Gill William 11 Missouri pg0306a.txt

6 536 536 Gill Josephus 61 M Watch Maker 2,100 South Carolina

7 536 536 Gill Martha 54 F Kentucky

8 536 536 Gill Mary 18 F Missouri

9 536 536 Gill Thomas 15 M Missouri X

10 536 536 Gill Ira 13 M Missouri X

11 536 536 Gill William 11 M Missouri X

12 537 537 Sally A.S. 24 M Sheriff Kentucky

Gill Adaline 27 Virginia 140 368 pg359.txt Warsaw City

Gill Drusilla 21 Mo 140 368 pg359.txt Warsaw City

Gill Elbert I. 32 Mo 140 368 pg359.txt Warsaw City

Gill Ewin P. 36 Mo 140 368 pg359.txt Warsaw City

Gill Ira 24 Mo 134 360 pg359.txt Township 40 Range 22

Gill Jerry 58 Virginia 149 379 pg371.txt Warsaw City

Gill Louella 6/12 Mo 140 368 pg359.txt Warsaw City

Gill Lucy 52 Ky 149 379 pg371.txt Warsaw City

Gill Martha 64 Ky 134 360 pg359.txt Township 40 Range 22

Gill Mary 28 Mo 134 360 pg359.txt Township 40 Range 22

Gill Roena 8/12 Mo 140 368 pg359.txt Warsaw City

Gill Sarah 45 143 371 pg371.txt Warsaw City

Gill William 2 Mo 140 368 pg359.txt Warsaw City

1860 CENSUS:

INE | Dwell | Famil | Lastname Firstname | Age S Color | Occupation | Real Personal | BirthPlace | Married Scho R D | SNDX | Remarks

=====|=======|=======|===============================================|==================|==========================|================|======================|===================|======|================================================================================================

9 | 758 | 755 | Gill Martha | 64 F | Farming | 1200 492 | Ky | | G400 |

10 | 758 | 755 | Gill Mary | 28 F | | | Mo | | G400 |

11 | 758 | 755 | Gill Ira | 24 M | | | Mo | | G400 |

More About JOSEPHUS (JOSEPH) GILL:

Burial: PROBABLY Benton Co., MO

Comment: July 12, 1847, Origin of letter to daughter, Mrs. Zeralda Gill, was Black Oak Grove, near Warsaw, MO

Occupation: Farmer & Watchmaker

Parents (Facts Pg): s/George GILL-Mary Lewis(?)

More About JOSEPHUS GILL and MARTHA BROWDER:

Marriage: October 24, 1816, Hopkins Co., KY

Children of JOSEPHUS GILL and MARTHA BROWDER are:

41. i. ZERELDA4 GILL, b. 1823, Howard Co., MO.

ii. EDWIN R. GILL, b. 1824, Howard Co., MO.

Notes for EDWIN R. GILL:

Edwin was a businessman in Warsaw. He owned a prosperous tin shop on the corner, and in 1854 stood near the Southwest Democrat Printing office on Main Street. In 1859 his advertisement appeared in the local newspaper:

Ed.R. Gill

Dealer in

Stoves & Tinware

Warsaw, MO

I HAVE on hand a very large number of COOK and HEATING STOVES of every description and size, which I am selling as low as any house in the State, St. Louis excepted, and my Tinware...newer than any shop in the State. Come and try me, and be convinced...Guttering made so any person can put it up. A large quantity always on hand. Tinware repaired with neatness and dispatch.

Self-sealing fruit cans of all sizes always on hand.

Above copied from Twyla Gi8 Wright's, "LATCHSTRINGS"

More About EDWIN R. GILL:

Parents (Facts Pg): Son Josephus Gill & Martha Browder

iii. ELBERT J. GILL, b. 1826, Howard Co., MO.

Notes for ELBERT J. GILL:

Elbert J. Gill was a respected citizen who took pride in civic affairs. He was listed in the newspaper in 1855 as one of the managers who was selling tickets to a Grand Civic Ball on Washington's Birthday in Warsaw. He also served Warsaw as its postmaster from 1862 to 1864, during the Civil War.

More About ELBERT J. GILL:

Comment: July 12, 1847, Josephus said in a letter to his daughter Zereldah, that Elbert and his mother were running the farm near Warsaw, MO

Parents (Facts Pg): Son Josephus Gill & Martha Browder

iv. MARY GILL, b. 1832, Howard Co., MO.

More About MARY GILL:

Census: 1870, Still residing at home with Martha, her mother, Lindsey, Benton Co., MO

Parents (Facts Pg): Dau. Josephus Gill & Martha Browder

42. v. THOMAS J(EFFERSON) GILL, b. July 17, 1833, Fayette, Howard Co., MO; d. 1922, probably Cincinatti, OH.

43. vi. IRA GILL, b. 1836, Howard Co., MO; d. March 28, 1927, Benton Co., MO.

vii. WILLIAM TELL GILL, b. 1839, MO; d. June 17, 1861, Killed In Civil War while serving with Warsaw Confederates.

Notes for WILLIAM TELL GILL:

Benton Co., MO was a border county of Civil War activities. Regular armies, rebels and bushwhackers of both Union and Confederates swept Missouri. Since the county was criss-crossed with major roads, many military groups marched through the countryside. The citizens of the county were divided. Southern sympathizers raised their flag on the court house lawn at Warsaw during the circuit court meeting after the encounter of Fort Sumpter. Not far away, at Cole Camp, the Germans were patriotically for the Union, and formed a Home Guard there. Tension rose to the melting point.

On June 17, 1861, young William Gill marched proudly in a unit of Warsaw Confederates, under the command of Captain O'Kane. They were on their way to Camp Cole, providing a cover tactic to allow the Confederate sympathizing govenor to escape south to set up the capitol at Carthage. Two barns gave shelter to the Union troops at Cole Camp. At dawn an attack was made on one barn, with William screaming the "Rebel Yell" as he ran. In the first onslaught he and five other rebels were killed.

Inmates of the barn scattered, and after attacking the second barn the Confederates held the grounds. Nineteen had died, and 22 lay wounded. That night they buried William and the others, then marched back to Warsaw the next day.

Martha's heart must have been broken at the death of her youngest child, cut down in his youth, but like other Southern sympathizers she may have born her grief as a gift to the cause.

More About WILLIAM TELL GILL:

Burial: Buried near Warsaw, MO where he fell

Military service: 1861, Confederate Army in MO. during the Civil War.

Parents (Facts Pg): Son Josephus Gill & Martha Browder

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Copyright  of these digital records ©2006, Ed Gill, all rights reserved.  These documents may be freely used for private purposes, and included in your own genealogy. However, this document is copyrighted and may not be sold, nor given to anyone who may attempt to derive profit from same. Please send any errors, corrections, conjectures, updates, etc. to Dr. Frank O. Clark.