GILL AND RELATED FAMILIES IN CENTRAL MISSISSIPPI

A work in progress, speculation and conjecture by Roy Gill, portions of which have been gathered from all over the place.

ORIGINS:

After the Revolutionary War, Georgia wanted good people to come into the state and settle. Georgia passed a land law in 1777 called the "Head-Right Plan," giving the head of a family up to 200 acres of land for himself and 50 acres for each one of his family, counting his slaves, but no family could have more than 1,000 acres.

The royal governor of Georgia and the Council advertised in the newspaper of New Bern, North Carolina, that free land in Georgia would be given to settlers.  The notice began a wave of settlers from the North Carolina counties of Onlsow, New Hanover, Duplin, Sampson, Bertie, Johnston and Edgecombe that would last for over 60 years.  There are very few of the early families of Bulloch and Screven Counties that do not trace to the settlers from this area of North Carolina.  Very few records survive from the period 1777 to 1790 in Effingham, so the story of the early settlers is not very clear.

BULLOCH COUNTY, GEORGIA

By Act of December 14, 1793 Screven County was formed from parts of Burke and Effingham Counties.  The following is the text of the petition to the state convention asking that Bulloch County be created from Scriven (now spelled Screven) and Bryan counties (part of Effingham Co. also became Bulloch).

His Honor the Chairman And gentlemen members of the convention of the State of Georgia, 1795

The Petition of the Citizens of Scriven and Bryan Counties humbly sheweth – that your Petitioners are desirous of representing to your Honors. The inconveniency the Citizens of Scriven County labour under, when of necessity they are obliged to attend on public requisitions, having Ogeechee river to cross, Generally full of water and badly accommodated with flats canoes_________

As well your Petionioners pray your Honors will reflect a moment – on that Act Passed the last Session of the General Assembly "Ordering the County of Bryan to extend from the Georgia coast to the lower line of Scriven County the full extent from the Georgia coast to the lower line of Scriven County the full extent of Chatham and Effingham counties, rendering it extremely inconvenient for the inhabitants of the upper part to attend on public requisitions at Hardwick a distance of at least sixty miles.

Therefore under these circumstances (unless a General mode for the Divison of Counties should be adopted)

We petition your Honors that the county of Bryan extend no farther up Ogeechee river than Bryan’s Cowpen (so called) fence with a SoW direction ‘till it intersect with Liberty county line. And that the upper_____(having the aforesaid boundary) and that part of Scriven County lying on the south side of Great Ogeechee river as high up said river as Skulls Creek be a separate and distant county – And to avoid a discontent, which would otherwise consequently arise – let our public buildings be established as near as convenient to the centre Thereof.

And your Petionioners will ever pray: (listed below are six of the 125 signatures on the petition)

Robert Gill........ Joseph Knight

James Gill ........ Robert Knight

Thomas Gill ........ John Martin

(These are the only Gills listed on the petition.)

The Georgia Legislature took lands from both Bryan and Screven Counties Feb. 8, 1796, for the purpose of creating "Bullock" County.  Although the legislative act created "Bullock"; it should have been spelled "Bulloch" after the man it was named for, Patriot Archibald Bulloch, the first president of Georgia when Georgia was a sovereign state during the Revolutionary War.  He was also one of Georgia’s delegates to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia from 1775 through 1776.  He died in 1777 while holding the title of first governor of Georgia. Georgia Historical Society

In 1773, the Creek Indians signed a treaty giving up the coastal islands between the mouth of the Ogeechee River and the mouth of the Altamaha River in return for debts they owed to traders.  This treaty opened up for settlement a large area which included present day Bulloch County.  This pineland was considered poor and was not settled as rapidly as other sections of the state.  However, settlers did comeHardy pioneers from Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina came into these lands, settling in what later became Screven and Bulloch County.  The land along the Ogeechee River was good oak and hickory land.  This was taken up and settled first. Behind this was the piney woods which was settled slowly.  The first settlers were stockmen.  The soil in Georgia was very poor and Georgia weather was either flood or drought, and it was either too hot or too cold.  There were very frightening thunderstorms.  Living was a struggle in the Georgia backcountry. Many of the westward-bound pioneers were eager to sell their property at any price. Spirit of a People.

Baptist was the dominant religion in Bulloch County, Georgia.

The above information is from the Knight Family of Bulloch County, Georgia History.

Georgia Headright and Bounty Grants

While the Revolutionary War was still in progress, the General Assembly of Georgia passed two Acts relating to the granting of land, but until 1782 the State was overrun and occupied by the British and the government was so disorganized that the necessary official machinery for surveying and granting land was never perfected.  As a result, both of these Acts became ineffectual and are referred to here only as a matter of historical interest.  The first of these was the Act of June 7, 1777 (as amended by the Act of September 16, 1777) entitled "  An Act for opening a land office and for the better settling and strengthening this State;’ the second was the Act of January 23, 1780, entitled "An Act for the more speedy and effectual settling and strengthening this state."  Actually only a very few surveys were ever made under these Acts and the first grant of land based on any of such surveys was not signed and issued until October 22, 1783.  Neither Act provided for a fee-simple grant, but both followed the Colonial requirement for the annual payment of rent of two shillings on each hundred acres in the grant, in addition to settlement and cultivation within nine months.  However, both Acts recognized the fact that many Colonial and State records had been lost or destroyed during the war and stipulated that, despite their loss, those persons who could produce some proof of an application for survey, or an agreement to purchase, or settlement under any Colonial law or grant, would be entitled to confirming grants.  One feature of both Acts, which was followed in every subsequent Act, was that a man would be entitled to 200 acres as his own headright plus an additional 50 acres for his wife, each child and each slave, but that in no event could the total grant exceed 1000 acres.

The first effective land Act was the Act of February 17, 1783 (as amended by the Act of August 1, 1783) entitled an "Act for opening the land office and for other purposes therein mentioned."  This Act allowed a man to take up 200 acres upon his own headright free of any charge except office fees for survey and grant, plus an additional 50 acres upon the head of each member of his family at sales prices ranging from one to four shillings per acre, and it limited any grant to a maximum of 1000 acres.  The rights of persons who had previously received warrants of survey were ratified, and they were declared to be entitled to grants to land occupied by them.  Those persons who, under legislation passed during the War, had become entitled to bounty lands, such as citizens who had not molested their neighbors’ families or property, refugees who had served in militia companies outside the State, militia men of the State and men who had served in the minute battalions were declared entitled to grants, without charge except the office fees.  The machinery for granting land, as set up by this Act, was as follows: The applicant for land would appear before the land court of the county in which he desired land, composed of at least five Justices, and after making oath as to the size of his family, including slaves, would obtain a warrant of survey.  The county surveyor would then lay out his land, keep a copy of the plat of survey in his office, and forward a copy to the Surveyor General.  After living on the land a year and cultivating at least three per cent of the acreage, the settler would then apply to the Governor’s office for his grant and pay all purchase price due and all office fees.  The grant would then be issued and recorded

The Act of February 25, 1784, which was passed primarily to create and open up Franklin and Washington Counties, made some revisions in the grants laws previously enacted.  The sales price of land in those two counties was fixed at three shillings per acre, and the maximum grant was again limited to 1000 acres.  Bounty grants could be located in the new Counties, and all the bounty grants in all the counties were no longer to be tax free for ten years but were to be increased fifteen per cent in acreage.  A large section, in what later became Greene County, was reserved exclusively for bounty grants to men who had served in the Continental Line or Navy, as distinguished from citizens, refugees or militiamen. For the first year members of the Executive Council were to act as the land courts for the new counties, prior to their organizations.

Under the Act of February 22, 1785, the provisions for payment of a purchase price or consideration for granted land, other than office fees, were removed, and thereafter all land was granted free.  Cultivation was no longer a requisite.  However, the restrictions as to the amount of land to which a man was entitled on his own and his family’s headrights and the restriction to a 1000-acre maximum remained unchanged.  No surveys for bounty grants were to be made after February 22, 1786, but as to bounty land surveyed prior to that date, a grant could be made upon the warrant at any time thereafter.

Index to the Headrights and Bounty Grants of Georgia, 1756-1909 / ed. by Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr.  Pub info: Greenville, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1992, c1982.

Below are listed excerpts of the Headright and Bounty Grants for Georgia before 1820.  

Grantee

Location of Grant

Grant Book

Page

Acres Granted

Year of Grant

Days Gill

Richmond

TTT

597

200

1790

James Gill

Bulloch

G.5

367

200

1808

James Gill

Bulloch

G.5

88

200

1807

James Gill

Effingham

UUUU

689

450

1795

Jeremiah Gill

Effingham

H.5

421

250

1811

Jeremiah Gill

Effingham

H.5

422

200

1811

Jno. (John?) Gill

Effingham

BBBBB

50

300

1799

John Gill

Liberty

DDDDD

364

100

1801

Robert Gill

Effingham

AAAA

170

200

1793

Robert Gill

McIntosh

F.5

341

200

1806

Thomas Gill

Effingham

G.5

518

200

1809

Young Gill

Clarke

G.5

258

350

1808

  BULLOCH COUNTY, GEORGIA - Early Marriage Records 1796-1850

GILL, James (Jr.?) married NEVILS, Fanny 09/22/1808 

GILL, John married KING, Mary 12/24/1807 

 

Thomas Gill Information

James, Thomas and Robert Gill apparently came to Mississippi via Bulloch Co., GA in 1811.  They appear to be the three Gills who applied for a passport through Indian Lands en route from Bulloch Co., GA to Marion Co., MS.

----------

28 January 1811: Passports through the Creek Nation were requested for:

Robert Gill and his wife (no children)

James Gill with his wife and 7 children

Thomas Gill with his wife and 5 children

            Wife > 21

            2 males

                        David-3

                        James-2

            3 females         

                        1 f 5-15; 2 f < 2

----------

1813-Mississippi Territorial Census-Marion Co., MS

Thomas Gill; white male > 21; no family-may be some error in reporting.

----------

Although some researchers disagree with me, I believe David to be Son #1 and James to be Son #2 and Son #3 is UNK.  The 1811 passports show Thomas, his wife and 5 children.  The 1820 Marion Co. census shows children; 1 female 16-26 and 2 females < 10, meaning when the passports were issued, 1 female would be 7-17 and 2 females < 2.  Assuming that is true, it would mean the other two were males < 5.  These males would be David, born in 1808, (the 1850 Newton Co. census shows his age as 42 and the 1860 Saline Co., AR census shows his age as 52), and James, born in 1809, (shows on the 1850 Rankin Co. census as aged 41.)  Therefore, Son #3 would have been born in 1810 since the 1820 census shows 3 males 10-16; David would have been 12, James would have been 11 and Son # 3 would have been 10, born probably in GA because the passports were not issued until 1811.

----------

1820 Mississippi Census-Marion Co., MS (*-indicates what shown on census)

Thomas Gill, white male; > 45; born < 1775

*          Wife > 45; born <1775

*          3 males 10-16; born 1804-1810

                        Son #1-David- born 1808 in GA (12 yr old)

                        Son #2-James- born1809 in GA (11 yr old)

                        Son #3-UNK-born-1810 in GA

*          2 males < 10; born 1810-1820

                        Son #4-Simeon-born 1815 in MS (5 yr old)

                        Son #5-John-born 1815 in MS (5 yr old)

*          1 female 16-26; born 1798-1804 in GA

*          2 females < 10; born 1810-1820 in GA

----------

1830 Mississippi Census-Rankin Co., MS (*)

Thomas Gill, white male; 50-60; born 1770-1775 (2 oldest sons and 2 oldest daughters had left household)

*          Wife; 50-60; born 1770-1780

            Son #1-David-1808-(22) married 8/20/1832 in Rankin Co. to Catherine Cooksey

            Son #2-James-1809-(21) married about 1832

*          1 male 20-30; born 1800-1810

                        Son #3-UNK

*          2 males 10-15; born 1815-1820

                        Son #4-Simeon-born 1815-(15) married Jane Drummons 2/5/1835

Son #5-John-born 1815-married Elizabeth Miles 3/12/1840; married Malinda Neely 8/28/1846

*          3 males 5-10; born 1820-1825

                        Son #6-Daniel-born 1821 (9)

                        Son #7-Henry-born 1822 (8)

                        Son #8-?

*          1 male < 5; born 1825-1830

                        Son #9-William-1830-married Delaney Barfoot

*          1 female 15-20; born 1810-1815

 

Note: By the time of the 1830 census only one of the sons born 1804/1810 (?) is still in the household and daughter #1 and daughter #2 are not present in the household. It would seem likely that they married and left home (or died) before 1830.

----------

1840 Mississippi Census-Rankin Co., MS (*)

Thomas Gill, 50-60; born 1780-1790

*          Wife, 50-60; born 1780-1790

                        Son #1-David-1808-Rankin Co.-1 m 30-40; 2 m < 5; 1 f 20-30; 1 f 5-10; 1 f < 5

                        Son #2-James-1809-Rankin Co.-1 m 30-40; 2 m < 5; 1 f 20-30; 1 f 5-10; 1f < 5

                        Son #3-UNK

                        Son #4-Simeon-1815-Rankin Co.-1 m 20-30; 1 f 20-30; 1 f < 5

                        Son #5-John-1815-married Elizabeth Miles 3/12/1840; married Malinda Neely 8/28/1846

                        Son #6-Daniel-1821-married Lucinda Neely 9/11/1845

*          2 males 15-20; born 1820-1825

                        Son #7-Henry-1822--married Phaneul Odom about 1847

                        Son #8

*          1 male 10-15; born 1825-1830

                        Son # 9-William-1830

----------

1840-GILL THOMAS Rankin County MS 13 1840 Federal Census Index

1840-GILL THOMAS Rankin County MS 193 No Township Listed 1840 Federal Census Index
1841-GILL THOMAS Rankin County MS No Township Listed MS 1841 State Census Index

1845-GILL THOMAS Rankin County MS 007 No Township Listed MS 1845 State Census Index

----------

GILL, THOMAS of Rankin County

Land Office: MT SALUS

Document Number: 27665

Total Acres: 79.93

Issue Date: June 25, 1841
Entry Classification: Sale-Cash Entries

Legal Land Description: 1 NNW CHOCTAW No 3N 2E 34

----------

1850 Mississippi Census

Thomas apparently died between 1845 and 1850-was listed on 1845 State census for Rankin Co.

            Wife apparently died between 1840-1850

                        Son #1-David-1808-on Newton Co. census

                        Son #2-James-1809-on Rankin Co. census

                        Son #3-UNK

                        Son #4-Simeon-1815- on Rankin Co. census

                        Son #5-John-1815-on Rankin Co. census

                        Son #6-Daniel-1821-on Rankin Co. census

                        Son #7-Henry-1822-on Newton Co. census-Phaneul (Odom) d. Narcissa

                        Son #8-UNK

                        Son #9-William-1830-Newton Co.-m. Delaney Barfoot in Newton Co. about 1850

----------

1860 Mississippi Census

                        Son #1-David-1808-Saline Co. Arkansas census

                        Son #2-James-1809

                        Son #3-UNK

                        Son #4-Simeon-1815-in Arkansas w/David

                        Son #5-John-1815

                        Son #6-Daniel-1821-on Rankin Co. census

                        Son #7-Henry-1822-Newton Co., w/Susan Cooksey-3 children

                        Son #8-UNK

                        Son #9-William-1830-Newton Co.-

 

(*) means the individuals shown on the census-thru 1840.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

 

James Gill Information

28 January 1811: Passports through the Creek Nation were requested for:

1816 Mississippi Territorial Census: (With him in the census are Thomas Gill born <1795, no children, and Robert Gill born <1795, no children.)

James Gill 1 WM >21, 6 WM<21, 1 WF>21, 4WF<21, no slaves.

Probably born 1816-(21+10) or <1785.

 

In 1820 James Gill is still in Marion County: (Thomas Gill is with him in Marion County, Robert M. Gill has removed to Wilkinson Co., living alone.)

 

James Gill: born <1775, 3 WM<10, 1 WM10-16, 2 WM 16-26, 1 WM >45, 2 WF<10, 1 WF 10-16, 1 WF 16-26, 1 WF 26-45.

 

None seem to be present in 1830.  A James Gill died in Lawrence Co., MS in 1823.

 

James Gill born <1774 apparently died 1820-30, wife born 1775-1794. 

2 sons born 1794-1804

1 daughter born 1794-1804

1 son born 1804-10  (FOC believes this is Alice Weber's Robert Gill born c1805 in Georgia.  Only this James Gill has sons of the proper age in the MS 1816 census to fit Alice's line.)

1 daughter born 1804-10

3 sons born 1810-20,

1 daughter born 1810-1820

 

James Gill, Jr. Information

 

James, Sr.-1811 passport information: 7 children.

 

1816 Mississippi Territorial Census - Marion County:

James Gill, Sr., white male; >21, born <1795; wife >21, born <1795; 6 males & 4 females <21 residing in his home.  Note: All children are born after 1795.

 

1820 Mississippi Census - Marion County

James Gill, Sr., white male, >45 born <1775; wife 26-45 born 1775-1794;

6 males & 4 females <26 reside in his home.

2 males 18-26, born 1794-1802

0 males 16-18.

1 male 10-16, b 1804-1810

3 males 0-10, b.1810-1820

 

1830 Mississippi Census-Marion County

James Gill, Sr. is apparently no longer living.

 

1830 Mississippi Census - Marion County:

James Gill, Jr., white male, 20-40, born 1790-1810 (but as shown above - 1795-1802), wife 20-40, born 1790-1810;

1 male <10; born 1820/1830

1 female <10; born1820/1830.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Index to the Headrights and Bounty Grants of Georgia, 1756-1909 / ed. by Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr.  Pub info: Greenville, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1992, c1982.

 

Below are listed excerpts of the Headright and Bounty Grants for Georgia before 1820. 

 

Hugh Neely

Franklin

BBBB

112

200

1799

Jane Neely

Burke

CCCCC

295

200

1799

Jno. Neely

Burke

CCCCC

296

100

1800

Jno. Neely

Burke

TTT

447

350

1790

Jno. Neely

Burke

TTT

446

200

1790

Jno. Neely

Burke

TTT

445

130

1790

Jno. Neely

Wash’ton

AAAAA

179

200

1798

Jno. Neely

Wash’ton

KKK

139

150

1786

Richd Neely

Burke

III

836

200

1786

Richd Neely

Burke

KKK

378

200

1786

Samuel Neely

Camden

K-S

965

450

1816

Thomas Neely

Wash’ton

2222

476

157

1797

Wm. Neely

Camden

K-5

30

252

1814

Wm. Neely

McIntosh

DDDDD

422

199

1801

Wm. Neely

McIntosh

DDDDD

423

200

1801

Jno. Neelly

Burke

HHH

90

200

1785

Jno. Neelly

Burke

HHH

107

100

1785

Jno. Neelly

Franklin

FFF

662

287-1/2

1785

Thos. Neelly

Burke

RRR

198

100

1789

Thos. Neeley

Wash’ton

O-5

225

12

1821

 

William Neely

 

Name: William Neely

Birth: ABT. 1710 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania; Death: 29 DEC 1782 in N. Fork Flat River, Caswell County, North Carolina; Note: [Roy Edward Brown, Jr., D.C..FTW]

Neely History and items of interest Neely History and items of interest; last update Feb. 2 1998; most of the data contained in this page was researched by the late Harold Neely, with updates from various other sources.

The Neely Family, Simpson County Mississippi

The few bits of information that my father told me in the 1930's about the Neely family in Simpson County, Mississippi have proven to be most helpful in my research of the Neely's. Those bits of information are worth repeating because they have been the guidelines used to keep the research properly directed. They are:

The Neely family came from North Carolina.  The Simpson County and Rankin Neely are closely related.  There was a migration of some members of the Simpson County Neely's to Arkansas or Texas in the mid 1800's.  With these facts in mind I have been able to accumulate data over many years and can now put the information in meaningful order.  The earliest direction ancestor I have identified is William Neely. Neely is spelled three ways in this research, Neely, Nealy and Neeley.

William Neely; Born---? Died 1782.  The birthplace of William Neely is not known yet. (However, data submitted by Eloyce Hubbard Kockler suggest that William was born about 1710 in Lancaster Pa.)  It is known that he owned land on the northeast form of the Flat River in what was then Orange County North Carolina as early as June 1756.  This land corresponds in description to that which is described in his will.  This location is not in Person County, North Carolina.  Person County was formed from Caswell County in 1791, nine years after the death of William Neely.  Caswell County was formed from Orange County in 1777.  The land on the northeast fork of the Flat River did not change only the county names.  William's will is quoted as follows:

(note) This information can be found in the North Carolina Department of Archives and History in Raleigh, North Carolina.

The State of North Carolina, Caswell County.

On the 29th of December in the year of Our Lord, 1782 William Neely who deceased on the 31st of said month and year above written made the following Verbal Will in the presence of the underscribers (to will) first, he gave and bequeathed unto Eleanor Neeley one third part of all his goods and Cattle also gave and bequeathed to his son Samuel Neeley, the one hundred acres of deeded land whereon he then lived also one hundred acres of land lying on the East side of the aforementioned land that is not in dispute and under- with Thomas Persons; for which the said Samuel Neely is to maintain the said Eleanor Neely his widow and appoint his son, Samuel Neeley, his executor of his will together with Eleanor Neely to settle his affairs, also he gave to Jacob Neeley, his son, the entry of land lying and being on both sides of Flat River, and the remainder of his goods and cattle to be equally divided between John Neeley, Thomas Neeley, Samuel Neeley, Joseph Neeley, Jacob Neeley and Mary Pryor and the over plus of the un deeded land to be sold and equally divided amongst the aforementioned children. The above will was proved before me, on of the justices of the said County this 31st day of December, 1782.

William White(Jurat)

His mark

John(x)Satterfield(Jurat)

His mark

James(x)----(Jurat) John Womack his mark March 1783

The above Will was duly proved in open county by the oaths of Wm. White, John

Satterfield, James _____, and ordered to be recorded.

The Execr. Qualified ACD. Murphy

 

The inventory of William Neeley's will is found in the same book as above mentioned will on page 253. Listed among is assets are horses, cattle, sheep, hogs, geese, one loom with taking and two hackles, one wooling wheel, two combing wheels, two guns, farm implements, carpentry tools and household furnishings.  The William Neeley that took up and in 1754, 1758 and 1767 along the N. C. -S. C. border on fishing Creek (West side of Cataba River) and on the North side of the Tiger River is not the same William Neeley who dies in Caswell County in 1782.  The will of that William has been located and indicated that he died October 10, 1778.  The Caswell County William Neeley probably came from some where to the north Virginia, Pennsylvania or New Jersey.  These states are where many persons in Orange County in 1750's and 1760's had their origins.  It is shown in William Neeley's will that he and wife, Eleanor , had the following children: Samuel, Jacob, John, Thomas, Joseph and Mary Pryor.  Records show that at least two of the sons, Thomas, a lieutenant, and Jacob, a private were soldiers in the Revolutionary War. Thomas Neely returned to Caswell county following the war and became active in public life.  Little information has been found on what happened in the lives of the other children, with the exception of Jacob.

 

Marriage 1 Eleanor ? b: ABT. 1720 in Lancaster, PA?

Children

  1. Jacob Neely born 1757 in Caswell County, North Carolina or Orange Co.

  2. Thomas Neely born ABT. 1750 in Lancaster, PA?

  3. Samuel Neely born ABT. 1754 in Tennessee or Orange CO., NC

  4. John Neely born ABT. 1747 in Lancaster, PA?

  5. Joseph Neely born 5 SEP 1759 in Orange CO., North Carolina

  6. Mary Neely born 1762 in Orange CO., North Carolina

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Jacob Neely

Jacob Neely (William Neely1) was born 1757/1758 in North Carolina, and died 15 JUL 1845 in Rankin County, Mississippi. He was buried in Neely Cemetery (a.k.a. Liberty Baptist Church Cemetery), Pearl, Rankin County, Mississippi. He married Rebecca ABT 1785.  She was born in North Carolina.  He married Permeley Welch 26 SEP 1824.  He married Sarah Stanton 3 SEP 1830.

 

Name: Jacob Neely

Birth: 1757/1758 in North Carolina

Christening: SEP 1843 Liberty Baptist Church, Pearl, Rankin County, Mississippi

Death: 15 JUL 1845 in Rankin County, Mississippi

Burial: Neely Cemetery (a.k.a. Liberty Baptist Church Cemetery),Pearl, Rankin County, Mississippi 1

Event: Revolutionary War Veteran, D.A.R. Marker 1775-1783 Military Service U.S.A.

Note: http://www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/Cove/1410/REVOLT.HTML

Revolutionary War Vets

*Info provided by Rankin County Historical Society

Neely Jacob: ??? d. 15 July 1845 Aged 87 years, Revolutionary soldier 1775-1783

Neely (Liberty Baptist) Cemetery

 

Jacob was in the Battle of King's Mountain, and one of his comrades in this battle was William Steen, whose grandson many years later married a granddaughter of Jacob Neely in Mississippi.

  Jacob moved from Caswell County, North Carolina to Georgia, where he lived for fifteen years.  Having the pioneer spirit, he wanted to move farther west into the Mississippi Territory, which was made up in port of the present states of Alabama, Mississippi and Florida.  In about 1798, he traveled in a covered wagon from Georgia to Fort Stoddard (Mobile County), Alabama where he remained for about three years, then pushed farther on into the Territory to what is now Copiah County, Mississippi.  Here he lived for many years.  A few years before his death he moved into the home of his son, Thomas Neely, in Rankin County, Mississippi, where he died in 1845 and was buried in the old Liberty Baptist Church Cemetery.

The records of Liberty Baptist Church reveal that in September 1843, Jacob Neely, the father of Thomas Neely, came for baptism. He was an old man.

=====

Full Context of Marriages - Mississippi: to 1825:

Jacob Neely married PERMELY WELCH; 28 Sep 1824 in Copiah County, Mississippi

Mississippi Marriage Index: 1826-1850

Jacob Neely married SARAH STANTON; 03 Sep 1830 in Copiah County, Mississippi

=====

Name: Jacob Neely

Burial: Neely (Liberty Baptist) Cemetery, Rankin, Mississippi

Father: William Neely b: ABT. 1710 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Mother: Eleanor ? b: ABT. 1720 in Lancaster, PA?

=====

Neely Cemetery (a.k.a. Liberty Baptist Church Cemetery), Pearl, Rankin County, Mississippi

Jacob Neely, Revolutionary War Veteran; no date - 15 Jul 1845

Alexander Price, 20 Mar 1841 - 4 Jun 1905

Narcissa Jane Steen Price, 31 Mar 1853 - 25 Oct 1904

Clarkey Price, m/o Alexander Price, w/o Carrol J. Steen (sic); 10 Dec 1815 - 12 Sep 1882

Janie Steen Price, d/o A. & N.J. Price, 9 Oct 1892 - 1 Jul 1893

Carol Steen, 29 May 1816 - 2 Jan 1897

Margaret Ann Neely Steen, w/o Carol J. Steen; 66 years 9 months 23 days, no dates.

 

Marriage 1 Rebecca: born in North Carolina; Married: ABT 1785

 

Children

  1. Thomas Neely b: 2 APR 1787 in Georgia

  2. David Neely b: 22 JAN 1791

  3. James Neely b: 30 JAN 1793 in Georgia

  4. Polly Neely b: 4 FEB 1795

  5. Elizabeth Neely b: 4 FEB 1795

  6. Henrietta Neely b: 24 DEC 1797

  7. Wilkins Neely b: 20 NOV 1800

  8. {?} Neely

Marriage 2 Permeley Welch: 26 SEP 1824

Marriage 3 Sarah Stanton 3 SEP 1830

 

Name: Rankin County Historical Society, Inc.

Brandon, Mississippi 39043

 

Title: Rankin County, Mississippi, Cemetery Records, 1824-1980

Publication: Sixth Printing, published 1998

Abbrev: Rankin County, Mississippi, Cemetery Records, 1824-1980

Note: Jacob Neely; Revolutionary Soldier, D.A.R. Marker 1775-1783.

 

Children of Jacob Neely and Rebecca are:

  1. Thomas Neely was born 2 APR 1787 in Georgia, and died 16 FEB 1874.

  2. David Neely was born 22 JAN 1791.

  3. James Neely was born 30 JAN 1793 in Georgia, and died 23 JUN 1879.

  4. Polly Neely was born 4 FEB 1795.

  5. Elizabeth Neely was born 4 FEB 1795.

  6. Henrietta Neely was born 24 DEC 1797, and died 20 SEP 1830.

  7. Wilkins Neely was born 20 NOV 1800, and died 6 SEP 1833.

  8. {?} Neely.

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Thomas Neely (Jacob Neely2, William Neely1) was born 2 APR 1787 in Georgia, and died 16 FEB 1874.  He was buried in Neely Cemetery (a.k.a. Liberty Baptist Church Cemetery), Pearl, Rankin County, Mississippi.  He married Polly (Mary) 1810. She was born in South Carolina, and died 4 OCT 1822.  He married Catharine McCaskill 10 JUL 1823 in Copiah County, Mississippi, daughter of McCaskill.  She was born ABT 1803 in South Carolina, and died 1 NOV 1868.  She was buried in Neely Cemetery (a.k.a. Liberty Baptist Church Cemetery), Pearl, Rankin County, Mississippi.

Children of Thomas Neely and Polly (Mary) are:

Children of Thomas Neely and Catharine McCaskill are:

  1. Oliver Neely was born 30 NOV 1824 in Mississippi, and died 10 SEP 1860.

  2. Margaret Ann Neely was born 5 FEB 1826 in Simpson County, Mississippi, and died 28 NOV 1892 in Cato, Rankin County, Mississippi.

  3. Martha Ann Neely was born 7 NOV 1827 in Mississippi, and died 6 OCT 1901.

  4. Harriet Neely was born 11 AUG 1829 in Mississippi, and died 17 JAN 1906.

  5. Austin Neely was born 24 APR 1831 in Mississippi, and died 21 MAR 1917.

  6. Catharine Neely was born 29 AUG 1833 in Mississippi, and died 20 SEP 1863.

  7. Andrew Jackson Neely was born 10 SEP 1835 in Rankin County, Mississippi.

  8. Mary Ann Neely was born 29 SEP 1841 in Mississippi, and died Y.

 

James Neely (Jacob Neely, William Neely) was born 30 JAN 1793 in Georgia, and died 23 JUN 1879.  He was buried in Richland Cemetery (a.k.a. Plain Cemetery), Richland, Rankin County, Mississippi. He married Melany O.  She was born 1803 in South Carolina, and died DEC 1859.  She was buried in Richland Cemetery (a.k.a. Plain Cemetery), Richland, Rankin County, Mississippi.

Children of James Neely and Melany O. are:

  1. William Neely was born ABT 1823 in Mississippi.

  2. Nancy Neely was born ABT 1826 in Mississippi.

  3. Thomas Neely was born ABT 1828 in Mississippi.

  4. James H. Neely was born ABT 1829 in Mississippi.

  5. Rebecca Neely was born ABT 1831 in Mississippi.

  6. Irvin E. Neely was born 27 AUG 1832 in Mississippi, and died 17 DEC 1883.

  7. Wilkins Neely was born ABT 1834 in Mississippi.

  8. Margaret Neely was born ABT 1836 in Mississippi.

  9. T. E. P. Neely was born ABT 1838 in Mississippi.

Wilkins Neely (Jacob Neely, William Neely) was born 20 NOV 1800, and died 6 SEP 1833.

Children of Wilkins Neely are:

  1. David Neely was born ABT 1824.

  2. Mary Neely was born ABT 1825.

  3. James P. Neely was born 23 APR 1825, and died 4 JAN 1868.

  4. Sarah Ann Neely was born 24 FEB 1827, and died 18 FEB 1900.

  5. John George Neely was born 15 SEP 1828, and died 12 SEP 1908.  He married Melvina Spell. She was born 1836, and died 19 JAN 1904.

  6. Rebecca Jane Neely was born {abt 1832}.  She married Green W. Russell 2 SEP 1850 in Rankin County, Mississippi, son of Jeremiah Russell and Mary.  He was born about 1820

 

(?) Neely (Jacob Neely, William Neely).

Children of {?} Neely are:

  1. Matilda Neely.  She married Edward Breeland 28 JAN 1831 in Rankin County, Mississippi.

  2. Bridget Neely was born 17 NOV 1816 in Mississippi, and died 14 JAN 1884.  She married Jonathan Hughs 27 DEC 1831 in Rankin County, Mississippi.  He was born 14 JAN 1809 in Georgia, and died 27 FEB 1891. 

  3. Joseph Neely was born 1817/1819 in Mississippi.

  4. Jacob Neely was born 1819/1821 in Mississippi.

  5. Lucinda Neely was born 1820/1825 in Kentucky, and died 9 JUN 1876 in Rankin County, Mississippi.

  6. Malinda Neely was born ABT 1820 in Kentucky, and died in Mississippi.

  7. Mary Neely was born 1821/1822.  She married Charles M. Williams 3 JAN 1840 in Rankin County, Mississippi.  He was born 1810/1811 in Georgia.

  8. Angeline Neely.  She married Lemuel I. Coleman 2/03 JAN 1840 in Rankin County, Mississippi, son of James Coleman. He was born 1818/1820 in Louisiana. 

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Index to the Headrights and Bounty Grants of Georgia, 1756-1909 / ed. by Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr.  Pub info: Greenville, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1992, c1982.

Below are listed excerpts of the Headright and Bounty Grants for Georgia before 1820. 

 

Wm. Cooksey

Montgomery

H.5

90

400

1810

Wm. Cooksey

Wash’ton

BBBBB

360

220

1799

Cooksey and Allied Families

According to daughter Faythe Katherine (Kate) Trammell, Nancy Cooksey Parks was born at Savannah, Georgia on 12 April 1804, and died in Newton County, Mississippi on 3 July 1876.  She was a generation younger than her husband, John Parks, Sr.  Nancy was, according to supporting evidence, the daughter of William Cooksey and Leanna Wesley.

William Cooksey was, according to J. L. Cooksey, born in South Carolina ca. 1754.  He enlisted as a private in the 1st Georgia Regiment, Revolutionary War. By 1797,  William was living in Montgomery County, Georgia.  One Montgomery County record includes a grant of 400 acres by the Governor of Georgia to William Cooksey on the 16th of August 1810.  William Cooksey later moved to Covington County, Mississippi, appearing on the Personal Tax Rolls for a time.  In 1828 he requested a pension for his military service indicating at that he had served under the comomand of Shadrack Wright, 1st Georgia Regiment. According to his grandson Samuel N. Cooksey, and so quoted from Samuel's Family Bible, William Cooksey died on 28 March 1828. This date is also confirmed in the Bible record of James W. Cooksey.

The children of William Cooksey and Leanna Wesley, as given by J. L. Cooksey, were: John C. Cooksey (married. Zilphia Price Rayburn); William Elston Cooksey (married. Flora McPherson); Mary Cooksey who married Robert Watson on 23 April 1819; Montgomery County, Georgia; Nancy E. Cooksey (married. John Parks); and George W. Cooksey.

The children of John C. Cooksey and Zelphia Rayburn Price, as given by C. L. Cooksey were: Samuel N. Cooksey (married. Syntha ______); Seley Cooksey, Lettie or Letitia Cooksey (married. James Augustus Rayburn); Catherine Cooksey (married. David Gill, son of Thomas); John Cooksey (married. Evaline Odom); and James William Cooksey.  We are able to confirm that Seley Cooksey was mistaken for Zilphia Cooksey who was married in Rankin County, Mississippi, to Thomas Sessums, with Thomas Sessums and John Cooksey as bondsman. Among the 32 original settlers of Neshoba County in 1834 (later partitioned to include Newton County) were Samuel Cooksey, Thomas Sessums, David Gill, and James Augustus Rayburn.

Samuel  N. Cooksey identified his mother by the first name of Zilphia, and her true identity represented one of the mysteries in the family tree for many years. A private record from Mrs. Josephine Short Lynch of Houston, Texas, shows the marriage of John Cooksey to Zilphia Price on 8 January 1809, Tattnall County, Georgia. The records of J. L. Cooksey, Austin, Texas, and descendant of James W. Cooksey, indicate that this John Cooksey is an oldest son of William Cooksey and Leanna Wesley.  This John Cooksey (or John C. Cooksey, as he also was identified) is said to have died ca. 1820-1822, either in Tennessee or in Greene County, Mississippi.

Two women by the name of Zilphia Price are listed in the Georgia Land Lottery of 1805 for Tattnall County.  Circumstances support the thesis that the correct Zilphia Price was the widow with two young children listed in this lottery, and that these children were Cader Price and Reubin Price.  Our findings are consistent with those of J. L. Cooksey, in this regard, although it is not clear whether Cader Price, Sr., or Zachariah Price was their father.  The maiden name of Zilphia, as given in the James W. Cooksey Bible, was Rayburn, also given as Raeburn. She was a daughter of James Rayburn and Makuldak (Huldy) Burfoot.

The Rev. Cader Price was born in Tattnall County, Georgia, on 8 January 1800, was later a resident of Covington County, and settled in Florence, Rankin County, Mississippi, where he was a pastor at Steen's Creek Baptist Church for a period of thirty-five years.  He was also a visiting evangelist, and his ministry included service to Pinckney Baptist Church in Newton County, Mississippi.  Cader Price married Eleanor Price (relationship unknown), and she taught him to read.  There is no record on their having any children; however, a nephew whom they adopted, John N. Gates, was an early church clerk at Pinckney Baptist Church and also the first husband of Martha (Patsy) Parks.  Rev. Price died at Florence, Mississippi on 24 May 1872.

Reuben Price, the second son of Zilphia Rayburn Price Cooksey, was born in Georgia in 1802, according to census records, and lived variously in Covington County, Rankin County, Newton County, and Scott County, Mississippi.  He was married to Hannah Cooksey, daughter of William Cooksey and Leanna Wesley, and had a large family.

After the death of John C. Cooksey, Zilphia continued with the family, first to Rankin County, where three of her daughters were married, then to Newton County where the family settled in 1834 in then Neshoba County.  She appears on the 1840 Federal Census for Newton County, but in general, her movements are difficult to follow.  She was known to have lived with her son James W. Cooksey, but doubtless lived with her son Samuel and other children at various times.  Mrs. Selma Jones of Alice, Texas, also a descendant, gives the date of Zilphia's death as 1844.  Samuel Cooksey, however, indicated that Zilphia died on 24 June 1857.  She was known to have been living after 1850, so Samuel’s record is probably correct.

Both James William and John later moved to Bell County, Texas, and Samuel N. would also move to Texas in 1876, deeding his land to his youngest son, Bartlett Watts (Bart) Cooksey at that time. The other children of John C. Cooksey and Zelphia Price, David and Catherine Cooksey Gill, Thomas and Zelphia Cooksey Sessums, and James Augustus and Letitia Cooksey Rayburn have numerous descendants in Newton, Leake, Scott and Amite Counties, Mississippi.

 

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Copyright ©2004, Roy Gill, all rights reserved. These documents may be freely used for private purposes, and included in your own genealogy. However, these documents are copyrighted and may not be sold, nor given to anyone who may attempt to derive profit from same.