Jasper County, South Carolina, Welcome!


Moving Finger of Jasper Co.

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MOVING FINGER OF JASPER - by GRACE FOX PERRY

(note introduction below this table)

TOWNS & PLACES
CHURCHES
PEOPLE
CLUBS AND PLANTATIONS
EDUCATION & INDUSTRY
THE VISIT fiction

Copyright ©2001, GRACE Fox PERRY, her heirs and assigns, all rights reserved.  Note by FOC: Ms. Perry did not copyright the original book.  I have personally digitized it and copyrighted the digitization to her heirs and assignes, while retaining use for the SCGenWeb, Jasper County web site..  I am breaking the text down into sections for faster web loading.  I will eventually add her pictures.


Golden Jubilee Edition

"The moving finger writes; and, having writ,
Moves on: nor all your piety nor wit
Shall lure it back to cancel half a line, Nor all your tears wash out a word of it."
(Rubayat of Omar Khay yam)

FOREWORD

Jasper County received its name from the Revolutionary Hero, William Jasper, Sergeant of the Grenadiers. The writer is indebted to the late A. S. Salley, state historian for much of the information given below.) Sergeant William Jasper was a member of the Grenadier Company of the Second South Carolina Regiment. This was one of six regiments furnished by the state, at the call for troops by the Continental Congress. Barnard Elliott, captain of the company, recruited young Jasper on July 7, 1775, in Halifax County, Georgia, now Burke County, and just across the Savannah River from South Carolina’s present Barnwell County.The story of Jasper’s brave deed at the fort, later calledFort Moultrie, is told thus in Captain Elliott’s dairy: "This Jasper was enlisted by Capt. Elliott of the Grenadiers of the Second Regiment, in Halifax County, Georgia, as a common soldier, but his extraordinary sobriety, his punctuality and readiness in obeying all orders while a private recommended him to his captain as a proper man for a sergeant; accordingly he appointed him to that office in October last, while he had the command of the battery at Fort Johnson. On the day of the engagement between the King of England’s fleet and Fort Sullivan’s, where he is with the company and the regiment he belongs to, he signalized himself in the following manner, viz: The flag being shot down and the staff falling to the ground in the heat of the action, Jasper called to his Colonel, Moultrie, ‘Colonel, don’t let us fight without our colour.’ ‘How can you help it,’ replied the Colonel, ‘the staff is gone!' 'Then I will replace it,' said Jasper, upon which he leaped over the wall, took the flag and tied it to a sponge staff and stuck it upon the merlon of the bastion near the enemy, gave three huzzas in the dangerous place he stood, and retired to his gun where he fought with his gallant company to the end of the battle. The President, John Rutledge, this day returning his thanks to the Sullivan's Island Garrison for their gallant conduct, and behavior in defense of the fortress, and taking his own sword from his side, presented it to Sergeant Jasper, and no doubt will soon compliment him with a commission." A short while before the siege of Savannah, Sergeant Jasper and a private soldier named Newton were out scouting in Georgia. Some women came to them in great distress, reporting that their husbands and relatives had been seized and carried away by the enemy. The two young soldiers followed, and as the British troops rested beside a spring, their arms stacked, Jasper and Newton charged in and took them prisoners. The noted Charleston artist, John Blake White, depicted this scene in his painting called "The Rescue." Two counties in Georgia today bear the names "Jasper" and "Newton." After the battle of Fort Moultrie, Captain

Elliott's wife had presented the regiment with a pair of colors. During the siege of Savannah, the Second Regiment was in the thick of the fight. Sergeant Jasper held one of the colors. When he fell, mortally wounded, he handed the flag to Lieutenant Bush. The lieutenant was killed immediately and fell into the ditch at the Spring Hill redoubt, the colors wrapped about his body. The enemy took the line a few minutes afterward, and this flag was later carried to London, where it was placed in the trophy room of the King's Royal Rifles. The other flag was carried safely away by the South Carolinians in their retreat. Tradition has it that Sergeant Jasper was once encamped at Purrysburg with his regiment. No one can say with certainty where he was buried, but historians believe it likely that his final resting place was beneath raw earth at the Spring Hill fortification (near the present Central of Georgia station), along with many of his comrades. Impressive monuments to him have been erected, both in Charleston and in Savannah.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

In this work, no effort has been made to list the early "baronies" of the landgraves and cassiques. That has been accomplished well, in other writings by historians. It is sufficient for my purpose to mention ownership of land as it pertains especially to the people of the area later to be known as Jasper County.

For material contained herein, all due acknowledgment is made to secular historians of the state, church historians, court records and family Bible lists; private family papers and letters; old newspaper files and clippings; Beaufort library manuscripts and volumes; South Carolina Historical Magazines; rare and out-of-print memoirs; verbal information volunteered by elderly Jasper County residents; and several surveys by industrial consultants.

I wish to thank the many, many persons who helped me, both directly and indirectly, in the publication of this book, the Golden Jubilee Edition of our county's story. It is not my book alone. It belongs to all of those from each community who gave me generously of their time and effort in this, the fiftieth year of Jasper County's existence.

Special thanks are due to the following persons, for the use of personal and other documents and materials:

Mrs. Samuel Augustus White, of Savannah, for the Glover papers; Mrs. Amarien Benton Coleman, for the Bostick correspondence; Edward P. Huguenin, Jr., for the Huguenin memoirs; Mrs. Pearl Gnann, of Savannah, for having made available the Salzburger writings; Mrs. Walker Smith, of Grays, for the Peeples papers: the late Mrs. C.H. Fleming, of Tilman, for her mother's notebook; A. Douglass Strobhar, of Savannah, for the Strobhar annals; Miss Ann Adele Clark of Swainsboro, Georgia, for the Hardee business records; Miss Claire Preacher, Mrs. W. J. Ellis; Mrs. H. D. Smith, of Hardeeville, and Mrs. Agnes Bailey Preacher for the old photographs used.

PLACES AND PEOPLE

Pocotaligo, Purrysburg, Robertville, Coosawatchie, Gillisonville, Grahamville, Arm Oak, Tillman, McPhersonville, Grays, Old House, Switzerland, Hardeeville, Ridgeland

CHURCHES OF THE COUNTY:

Euhaw Baptist, Black Swamp Baptist, St. Luke's, Holy Trinity Episcopal, Coosawhatchie Baptist, Gillisonville Baptist, Beaverdam Baptist, Great Swamp Baptist, Pine Level Baptist, Little Black Swamp Methodist, Tillman Methodist, Tillman Baptist, Hardeeville Methodist, Hardeeville Baptist, Red Dam Baptist, St. Anthony's Catholic, Ridgeland Presbyterian, St. Paul's Methodist, Ridgeland Baptist, Latter Day Saints, Ridgeland Advent Christian, Church of God of Prophecy, Independent Gospel Churches, Church of Christ

SALUTE TO MEN OF HISTORY:

Derry Gillison, Richard James Davant, E. M. Seabrbook, George Rhodes, Langdon Cheves, Jr., William F. Hutson, Strobhar Family, James W. Moore, Henry Martyn Robert, Abram Huguenin

TRIBUTE TO THIS-CENTURY NOTABLES:

Dr. William B. Ryan, Charles E. Perry, Sr., William J. Ellis, Samuel B. Owens, John Pat Wise, H. Klugh Purdy, Sr., Jacob Edward Smart

CLUBS AND PLANTATIONS:

Pineland and Chelsea, Spring Hill, Davant Plantation, Delta Plantation, Good Hope, Gregorie Neck, Mackay's Point, Okeetee Club, Red Bluff, Maurine, Sherwood, Turkey Hill, and Cypress Woods

TALK OF MANY THINGS:

Legends and Stories

GRAVED ON THE STONE - Quaint Inscriptions

THE EDUCATION STORY, THE AGRICULTURE STORY,

PROGRESS IN INDUSTRY

Morris Tuten Packing Company, Ridgeland Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Deerfield Sand and Mining Company, Whitener-Dwyer Lumber Company, Jasper Printing Company, W. M. Reddish and Sons, Sea Island Freezer Corporation, Holiday Wear, Inc

THE VISIT Fiction Story

 

 
SPONSORED BY
JASPER COUNTY
CONFEDERATE CENTENNIAL COMMISSION
ASSISTANT SPONSORS
RIDGELAND AREA SCHOOLS
RIDGELAND BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL
WOMEN’S CLUBAZALEA GARDEN CLUB
HOLIDAY WEAR, INC.
BANK OF RIDGELAND
K.B. CLOVER FARM
PERRY HARDWARE
PERRY-MOHN OIL COMPANY
MORRIS TUTEN PACKING COMPANY
PALMS MOTEL AND RESTAURANT
JASPER COUNTY SCHOOLS
HOME OF FLOWERS
J.A. RICHARDSON, JR., BUILDING SUPPLY CO.
RIDGELAND LIONS CLUB
CYPRESS WOODS CORPORATION
PIGGLY WIGGLY SUPER MARKET
RIDGELAND DRESS SHOP, MRS. J. H. LYNES
HOME FURNISHING COMPANY, INC.
JONES SEED AND FEED STORE
PALMETTO ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.
LANGFORD’S PHARMACYWHITENER-DWYER LUMBER CO., INC.
JASPER COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
KLECKLEY GAS COMPANY
OKEETEE CLUB
McTEER DRY CLEANERS
RIDGELAND FLOWER AND GIFT SHOPPE
RIDGELAND FUNERAL HOME
WESTERN AUTO ASSOCIATE STORE
HENDRICKS-CANNINGTON, INC.
GOOD HOPE CORPORATION
STRAWBERRY HILL PLANTATION
WILLIAM J. LANGFORD GROCERY, ROBERTVILLE
HARDEEVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HARDEEVILLE


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SCGenWeb - Jasper County, South Carolina

Copyright ©2001, GRACE Fox PERRY, her heirs and assigns, all rights reserved.  Used with permission by SCGenWeb, Jasper County web site.