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Southern Christian Advocate issue dated January 23, 1936 vol 100 #4 pg 6 col 1
from the Sandor Teszler Library of Wofford College

Mrs Josephine Bethea Stackhouse

With the translation of Mrs Josephine Bethea Stackhouse at her home in Latta on December 4, 1935, there passed a very unusual woman. The daughter of Evander R and Mary Stackhouse Bethea, she was born near Little Rock, Dillon County, on May 12, 1854.

Endowed by nature with an attractive personality, through a long life she cultivated with assiduous care the graces and virtues bestowed by the Holy Spirit on the children of God in the second birth. While very young she became a Christian, and while never demonstrative in her religious experience, those who had her daily life under closest observation saw such manifest fruits of the Spirit as "love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance, against which there is no law". While exceedingly modest in her profession, she came as near living in the 13th chapter of 1st Corinthians as is seldom given to mortals, through many years holding gentleness and firmness, prudence and courage, discernment and faith, magnanimity and endurance, self-hood and self immolation in rare poise in her beautifully symmetrical character.

Having said this, it is scarcely necessary to write of the kind of mother, homemaker, friend, neighbor, citizen and church member she became. By nature and religion she was undergirded for every relation in which she was placed. Left a widow on a farm at the age of thirty-four, with five small children to rear, with the finest judgement and most indomintable energy, she so managed the farm as to provide a comfortable home on the farm and later in town, equip each of her five children with a college education, and support most liberally school and church and all community betterment agencies. The sick and poor and needy found in her an ever ready helper. Her home was the seat of lavish hospitality, dispensed with such grace that all who shared it felt at home there indeed. Her friends were numbered by her acquaintedances, her most imtimate friends being her closest neighbors.

Her church had no more loyal supporter, her interest in all its work being maintained through a six year period of semi-invalidism which preceded the end. From the date of her marriage to death the Southern Christian Advocate was a regular visitor in her home and she prized its ministry very highly. Her long drawn out suffering was borne with the beautiful resignation and patience that any one knowing her would have anticipated and when the end came it was peace---perfect peace. In the church yard of her girlhood days her body sleeps by the dust of her husband, William B Stackhouse, who died in 1901, while her spirit still lives and loves and worships and serves in the Church on the other side.

Four children survive: Mrs W J Cottingham of Cullman, Ala., Mrs E C Major and Mrs J F Rogers of Latta, and William B Stackhouse of Little Rock. One daughter, Mrs Pearle Stackhouse Smith, went home some years ago.

R E Stackhouse

Submitted by Carolyn Klear, 5 Mar 2003.


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