Graphic by Brenda Wagner Welcome To
Marlboro County,
South Carolina History and Genealogy

 

 

Welcome Researchers!!!  

      This page is designed to be a resource for all Marlboro County, South Carolina researchers and your comments and suggestions on how the page could be improved are always appreciated.   

     If you have any data or documents relating to Marlboro County that you would be willing to contribute, please contact me. Just think what a wonderful FREE virtual library this could become if each of us contributed a Will, a Deed, a Bible record, whatever we have for the benefit of other Marlboro researchers.
--Victoria


 

 

 

South Carolina Links:

 

Neighboring Marlboro County are the counties of

 

 

Marlboro County History:

Marlboro County was named for John Churchill, first Duke of Marlborough (1650-1722)  one of the greatest commanders in British military history. He was a great strategist and a shrewd diplomat who led English and allied armies in important victories over the French, most notably at Blenheim (1704), Ramillies (1706), and Oudenaarde (1708). He played a key role in thwarting the designs of Louis XIV.  One of his descendants, Winston Churchill, also played a prominent role in European history.

The county name was originally spelled Marlborough, but it was later shortened. The county was created in 1785 as a part of Cheraws District, and the county seat is Bennettsville. Welsh Baptists from Delaware settled in an area of the county known as Welsh Neck around 1737, and they were later joined by English and Scotch-Irish settlers. Cotton growing made this a wealthy part of the state prior to the Civil War. The town of Blenheim was also known for its mineral springs. General Sherman's troops passed through the county in 1865, briefly occupying the town of Bennettsville. Some famous Marlboro County natives are United States Congressman and diplomat Robert Blair Campbell (1791-1862), United States and Confederate Congressman John McQueen (1804-1867), and children's advocate Marian Wright Edelman.

 

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County Seat

Bennettsville was founded in 1819 as the county seat for Marlboro County, as citizens desired a more central location for their courthouse than the original site on the eastern bank of the Great Pee Dee River. A three acre apple orchard situated on a bluff above Crooked Creek on the Great Metropolitan Stage Line from New York to New Orleans was selected. A courthouse designed by Robert Mills was constructed and streets and a square were designed. Bennettsville was named after then Governer Thomas Bennett.  After railroads reached Bennettsville during the 1880's, the economy boomed bringing with it a notable collection of both antebellum and Victorian homes surrounding the courthouse square, many of which are now housing a variety of businesses. Check out the photo gallery for just a few. According to local lore, the farmland here was so rich and fertile, it was once sold by the pound, not the acre. 

Mail List for Marlboro County Researchers.

The SCMARLBO mailing list, hosted by Rootsweb, provides a forum in email format for Marlboro researchers to discuss and share Marlboro County genealogy and history.

To subscribe, either click on the link below (automatic)
or (manual method)
send an email TO:

SCMARLBO-L-request@rootsweb.com
(for individual messages)
or
SCMARLBO-D-request@rootsweb.com.
(for digest mode)

In the subject line and body of the message, just write
subscribe


Please be sure to read your confirmation email - the address for posting is different from the address for subscribing!

You can search the archives for a specific message or subject matter or browse them, going from one message to another

Rootsweb Mailing List


The Pee Dee Tribe

For more information, contact the Pee Dee Association in McColl, SC or consult the references cited below:

  • Swanton, John R. The Indian Tribes of North America. (Washington: Smithsonian Institute Press).
    [See pages 75, 80, 97, 101, 103]
  • Terrell, John Upton American Indian Almanac. (New York: Barnes & Nobel Books).
    [See pages 128, 130, 153, 159]

 

 

 

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