THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION:
South Carolina Loyalists
Biographical Sketches


by Victoria Proctor

Graphics and background property of Victoria Proctor

ABEL, John - Private. Paid for the period of 14 June-13 December 1780 for service as a member of Richard King's Regiment, Long Cane Militia, Upper 96 Brigade, Capt. Jesse Campbell's Company. (Contributed by Ernie Abel, 27 Oct 2003).

ABEL, Joseph - Private, served in the loyalist militia in the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War in South Carolina. He was paid for the period of 14 June - 13 December 1780 and 20 Sepember 1781-6 April 1782 for service as a member of Colonel Cotton's Regiment, Stevenson's Creek Militia, 96 Brigade, Capt. John Larrance's Company. (Contributed by Ernie Abel, 27 Oct 2003).

ADAMS, John - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

ADAMS, Thomas - His estate was forfeited to the State of South Carolina. The "Heirs of Thomas Adams" are listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class I.

ADAMSON, John - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 as a Class V.

ADOLPH, Henry - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

AKINS, Hugh - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

AKINS, John - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

ALEXANDER, James - Of South Carolina. Born in Wiltshire, Alexander immigrated to America in 1774 and established a business connection. He was a leather draper and breeches maker. In 1777 he purchased a building in Orangeburg which he intended to use as a store; however, he was obliged to remain in Indian Fields, where he stayed with David Rumplis. Alexander went to Charleston in 1781 and worked for nine months in the Commissary's Department. He was awarded a pension of £30 per annum. Alexander claimed a loss of £562 sterling, and received £220.

ALEXANDER, Robert - Of South Carolina. A native of Ireland, Alexander immigrated to America in 1773 and settled in the Ninety Six District. He rented land after the reduction of Charleston by the British, and raised livestock which he later lost. Serving under both General Cunningham and Colonel Campbell in Georgia, Alexander was taken prisoner three times. His father, John Alexander, joined the British with his two sons and was killed at Little River. One of these sons was also killed in the British service. Robert Alexander later settled in Nova Scotia and estimated his losses from the war at £158 sterling, a sum which did not include his father's estate, a plantation of 150 acres, thirty of them cleared. He received £95 sterling. Appears on Colonel Benjamin Roebuck's List of Tory Militia, 1783.

ALLEN, Josiah - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

AMMONDS, William - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

ANCRUM, William - A native of England, Ancrum lived at Charleston as a merchant for many years. He was attainted by the state of South Carolina, and his property confiscated. He is listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class II, i.e., "Such of the former inhabitants of this Country, as presented congratulatory addresses to Sir Henry Clinton and Admiral Arbuthnot". He estimated his loss at £24,278 sterling.

ANDERSON, George - Of South Carolina. Anderson's father, John, emigrated from Ireland in about 1767, and acquired 300 acres of land on the headwaters of the Savannah River about twenty miles from Ninety Six. Both father and son served with the British Army. George contracted smallpox during the siege of Savannah in late 1779, and could not accompany his father and elder brother when they withdrew from Ninety Six with the British Army. He hid in the woods, and was eventually able to join them at Dorchester, South Carolina. His mother and her six other children were banished from their home, and joined the others at Dorchester. After six weeks, his mother, father and elder brother died, leaving him with six young children, most of whom were ill. Five of them later returned to Ninety Six, but in November 1781 George and the youngest child, Susan, embarked for Canada, where they settled at Belleisle in New Brunswick. He claimed a loss of £335 sterling and was awarded 89 sterling. [One Capt. Anderson is listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V.]

ANDERSON, Robert - Property sold by the Commissioners for Confiscations of the State of South Carolina. [Note: One Capt. Anderson is listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V. Do not know if it is Robert or George, above.--vp]

ARTER, William - Of South Carolina. A native of Ireland and a weaver by occupation. Arter went to Charleston in 1773 and from there to Ninety-six District. He married, acquiring 250 acres of land through his wife. Arter joined the British Army in Georgia in 1779 and was taken prisoner during the siege of Savannah. He escaped, rejoined the army, and served until the evacuation of Ninety Six, moved to Charleston, then to England in 1782 when Charleston was evacuated.

ASH, Richard Russell - Of South Carolina. Listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V. Went to East Florida at the evacuation of Charleston in 1782.

ASKEW, James - Of Charleston, South Carolina. A goldsmith and shopkeeper. At the outset of the war, he went to England, but returned to America in 1780.

ASKEW, Leonard - A native of England, Askew sailed for America in 1751 and settled in Charleston as a tobacconist. Following the evacuation of Charleston in 1782, he left for Jamaica.

ATKINS, Charles - Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class III. A native of England, Atkins immigrated to New York in 1756 and the following year left for Charleston, where he became a merchant. He at first supported the Whig position, acting as a private in the militia and holding office under the Whig government. During the British occupation of Charleston he raised a company in the royal militia. Atkins went to England in 1782, and was eventually awarded a pension of £100 sterling per annum by the British Treasury.

ATWAY / OTWAY, John - Indicted for treason against the state of South Carolina in a proclamation issued by Governor John Rutledge on November 8, 1779.


CONFISCATION LIST CLASSES:

CLASS I - Comprehends all British subjects who have property in this country, that is to say, such persons as never have submitted to the American Government.

CLASS II - Such of the former inhabitants of this Country, as presented congratulatory addresses to Sir Henry Clinton and Admiral Arbuthnot

CLASS III - Those who petitioned to be armed in defence of the British Government, after the conquest of this Province

CLASS IV - Those who congratulated Earl Cornwallis, on the victory gained at Camden

CLASS V - Those who have borne commissions, civil or military, under the British Government, since the conquest of this Province

CLASS VI - Obnoxious Persons

Source Notes:

1. Confiscated estates lists, published in the Royal Gazette newspaper at Charleston, 20 March 1782.

2. Sabine, Lorenzo. Biographical sketches of Loyalists of the American Revolution. (2nd Ed., 1864)

3. Records of the Loyalist Claims Commission, PRO, London

4. Miscellaneous Papers on Forfeited Estates, File Number S126170, Box 4, SCDAH, Columbia.
Record group includes returns filed by Tory militia commanders filed in 1783, as a result of Ordinance No. 1189, passed by the South Carolina Fifth General Assembly 17 March 1783.

Graphics and background property of Victoria Proctor

Graphics by Victoria

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