THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION:
South Carolina Loyalists
Biographical Sketches


by Victoria Proctor

Graphics and background property of Victoria Proctor

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BAILEY, Elijah - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

BAILEY, John - Of South Carolina. Property sold by the Commissioners for Confiscations of the State of South Carolina; listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class I. (May or may not be the same John Bailey who appears Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.--vp)

BAKER, Benjamin - Of Charleston, South Carolina. Baker died in 1780. His English niece, Ann Bayley, was his heiress, and was allowed £25 in full to go to America so that she might collect her inheritance. His property was confiscated, but subsequently restored. Heirs of Benjamin Baker were listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782

BAKER, John - A native of Charleston, South Carolina, Baker was educated in Britain and married Ann Pringle, the daughter of a captain in a loyal American regiment. Persecution as a Tory eventually deprived him of his reason. Ann returned to Britain with her daughter and in 1783 was residing in Edinburgh.

BAKER, William - Of South Carolina. Made a claim with Jane LINWOOD for a loss of 562 sterling.

BALFOUR, John - Of South Carolina. A native of Scotland, Balfour immigrated to America with his wife, Mary Ann, in 1773. He purchased 1,450 acres in several tracts in South Carolina, of which about 300 acres were cleared. He sought the protection of the British in 1780 and died within the British lines in November 1781. His widow, along with his three children, went to Britain at the evacuation of Charleston in 1782.

BALL, Elias - Two of this name, Elias Ball (Wambaw) and Elias Ball (Curmentie) were listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V, and are presumed to be father and son, for both filed claims with the Loyalist Claims Commission in England. Elias, a son, withdrew his separate application but his father was awarded £12,700 in compensation. Elias Ball was a native of South Carolina and living on his plantation about thirty-five miles from Charleston when the war broke out. He took an oath to the Whigs early in the Revolution, but offered the British his services shortly before they took Charleston in 1780. He guided Colonal Banastre Tarleton to Camden, and was afterwards appointed a colonel of militia by Lord Cornwallis; he was also a magistrate. Ball owned three plantations with a total of 14,200 acres and 300 slaves. His property was confiscated in 1782. Married and the father of five children, he went to East Florida following the evacuation of Charleston in 1782, and sailed for England two years later.

BALLINGALL, Robert - Of South Carolina. A merchant and planter of Charleston. A native of Scotland, Ballingall immigrated to America in 1753. He was taken prisoner by the Americans in 1777 at his plantation, taken to Charleston, and confined to the city. In 1779 he joined General Prevost's expedition but was a prisoner during the siege of Charleston. He was subsequently appointed colonel of militia and chief magistrate of a district immediately to the southwest of Charleston. Listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V.

Capt. BALMER - "Heirs of" listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class I.

BARBER, James - Of South Carolina. A native of Ireland, immigrated to America in 1775 when he was sixteen years of age. Worked as a laborer in Philadelphia until he was required to take an oath to the Whigs. Went to South Carolina and became a farmer. In 1778 he took possession of 100 acres for the price of the survey fee, about 20 sterling. When the British Army arrived at Camden, SC, he joined Col. Henry Rugeley's Loyal Militia, was promoted to quartermaster, but in 1781 he left the corps and returned to Ireland.

BARKER, James - Of South Carolina. Born in England, he immigrated to America in 1769 and settled at Georgetown, where he operated a pub. When the war began, he became a ferryman, which exempted him from military service. He joined the British Army in 1779 as a pilot, and applied for temporary assistance in London in 1784. A person of this name petitioned the Loyalist Claims Commissioners in London for a passage to Nova Scotia.

BARNES, Jacob - Of Camden, South Carolina. Had 100 acres on Moore's Creek. Filed a claim for £168 sterling.

BARNES, Moses - Of Camden, South Carolina. Had 100 acres, thirty cleared. Filed a claim for £184 sterling.

BARON, Alexander - Of Charleston, South Carolina. A physician, Baron settled in Charleston several years before the Revolution. Compelled to leave in 1777, he sailed to Britain, returning to Charleston during its occuption by the Royal Army. Following the evacuation of Charleston in 1782, he went to St. Augustine.

BARTON, Benjamin - Of South Carolina. Indicted for treason against the State in a proclamation issued by Gov. John Rutledge on November 8, 1779.

BATARK, Heirs of - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class I

BEARD, Robert - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class II. Born in England, Beard immigrated to America in 1766 and settled in Charleston, where he established himself as a tin plate worker. He made 300 sterling a year and bought 500 acres of land in Berkeley County. He asserted that he took oaths to neither side. Beard was allowed to remain in Charleston by the Whigs because his trade was useful to them. He was given permission to leave Charleston during the siege in 1780 but returned after the British occupied the city. Returned to England when Charleston was evacuated in 1782.

BEGBIE, William - Of South Carolina. A native of Scotland, Begbie immigrated to America in 1763, and when the war began was a shipbuilder in Charleston in partnership with Daniel MASON. Begbie loaded a ship with his possessions and left America in 1778, but was taken by a British privateer and brought to Jamaica. The Vice Admiralty Court there restored the cargo to him, since had been banished from South Carolina as a loyalist, but the ship was restored to a previous British owner who had lost the ship to an American privateer. Begbie returned to Charleston in 1780 but left for Britain when Charleston fell in 1782.

BELTON, Jonathan - Of South Carolina. Had 2,067 acres in five tracts in South Carolina and Georgia, owned twenty-one slaves. Residing in St. Augustine in 1783. (Possibly the "Bilton Jr." listed below)

BILTON, _______, Jr. listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V

BINNIE, William - A resident of Number 4, Elliot Street, Charleston, South Carolina. Went to East Florida following the evacuation of Charleston in 1782.

BIRCHAM, Joseph - A planter of South Carolina, fined for refusing to serve under the Whig government. Acted as a guide to the British Army in the Waxhaws on the border of North and South Carolina. Settled at Argyle, Nova Scotia after the Peace.

BISHOP, Drury - Of South Carolina. A Loyalist from Camden District in South Carolina, sold a plantation there to Zacharias GIBBES in 1779 or 1780.

BISHOP, John - Of Charleston, South Carolina. When the War broke out, Bishop had been a storekeeper there for twenty-three years, lived in America a total of forty years. His store was plundered and he was beaten in 1775 for refusing to sign a Whig association. Bishop was later banished and forced to embark for England.

BLACK, Joseph - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V

BLAIR, Robert - Of Cheraw, South Carolina; listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V. Residing at St. Augustine in 1783.

BLAKELY, Chambers - Of South Carolina, born in Ireland. Lived in Ninety Six District where he had 200 acres, twelve of which were cleared. He joined the British militia in Charleston in 1780, and served until the evacuation in 1782. Blakely settled afterwards in Nova Scotia. Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

BLEACKNEY (BLEAKNEY), David - Of South Carolina. Born in Ireland, Bleackney immigrated to America in 1767. When the war broke out he was living in Ninety Six District where had had 150 acres at Cuffy Town Creek, fifteen of which were cleared. He served initially in the American militia, but when the British took Charleston in 1780, he joined them and served at Ninety Six in the militia under Col. John Hamilton. Bleackney went with the British to Charleston, and then to Nova Scotia, where he settled in Westmorland County. He had a wife and six children. Filed a claim with the Loyalist Commission. Appears on Colonel John Purves' 1783 List of Tory Militia as "David Blakely".

BOLTON, Robert - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

BOONE, Thomas - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 Class I. A native of England, Boone was not in America after 1764 when he ended his term as Governor of South Carolina.

BOSSEAUX, James (BOISSEAU, James Edward) - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V. Born in St. Stephen's Parish, South Carolina in 1759. He had a plantation there of 3,000 acres of swampland which had been planted by his grandfather and left to him by his father. His mother was a Whig, and Boisseau served for a time in the Whig militia. When the British took Charleston in 1780, he joined the British. Was captured by the Whigs, imprisoned for three months, escaped, and made his way to Charleston where he was made a cornet in the South Carolina Royalists. When Charleston was evacuated, he went to Halifax.

BOWERS, Adam - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

BOWERS, Charles - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

BRAILSFORD, John - A native of England, he immigrated to America in 1775 with his father Robert (see below), who had purchased an estate in Charleston.

BRAILSFORD, Robert - (See John Brailsford above). In 1778 Robert was imprisoned for high treason and released on the condition that he return to England. Both Robert and his son John complied. Robert died in 1779 but his widow and children returned to Charleston in 1780 to take possession of his property. Finding that their estate was under the protection of British troops, they went on to Jamaica.

BREMAR, John - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class I. A native of South Carolina, Bremar was a lawyer and a protege of Sir Egerton Leigh. He was appointed Deputy Surveyor General in 1769, and acted as Deputy Attorney General for Sir Egerton on circuit. This arrangement and the financial advantages connected with it ceased when Sir Egerton went to England in 1774. In 1775 Bremar followed him and did not return to South Carolina.

BRISON (BRYSON), John - A native of Ireland, settled in Ninety Six District. Joined the militia at Ninety Six and was appointed an ensign by Colonel John H. Cruger; later served as a lieutenant in Charleston, in Colonel Pearson's Company. Settled in Nova Scotia after the war.

BROADHEAD, Thomas - Born in London; immigrated to Philadelphia in 1766. In 1774 or 1775 settled in Ninety Six District, purchasing 200 acres. Refused to serve with Gen. Nathaniel Greene against the British siege of Ninety Six; migrated to Charleston with the British and worked as an armorer until his return to Britain in 1782.

BRISBANE, James - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class IV

BROCKINGTON, John Jr. listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V

BROWN, Archibald - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class II.

BROWN, Charles - Worked in Charleston, South Carolina before the Revolution as a tobacconist. Captured by both a British privateer and a French frigate; prisoner in France for fifteen months, then moved to Jersey in the Channel Islands (England). In 1780 he petitioned for assistance to return to America.

BROWN, Hugh - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V

BROWN, James - Of South Carolina. Held 300 acres in Amelia Township, South Carolina. Served in both the American and British militia; eventually went with the British to Nova Scotia where he settled on the St. John River. Died between 1784 and 1787, leaving his widow Ann and three children.

BROWN, John - Of Camden District where he sold his plantation to Zachariah Gibbes in 1779 or 1780.

BROWN, Malcolm - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V. Estate forfeited to the State of South Carolina.

BROWN, Stephen - Estate forfeited to the State of South Carolina.

BROWN, Col. Thomas - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class I

BRUCE, David - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class II

BUCKILOR, Frederick - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

BUCKINGHAM, Elias - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class V

BUCKLE, Thomas Sr. - Both Thomas Sr. and Thomas Jr. are listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class II. Property was confiscated by the State of South Carolina but subsequently restored.

BULL, Fenewicke, Heirs of - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 as a Class I. Estate confiscated by the State of South Carolina, but subsequently restored.

BULL, William Jr. - Commissioned Lieutenant Governor 1759; Acting Governor for eight years between 1760 and 1775. In 1777 went to England but ordered to return to America in 1781. Was appointed Intendant of Police in Charleston. Bull attempted to save his property from confiscation by transferring it to his nephew Stephen. Was offered citizenship if he took an Oath of Allegiance but declined and made a claim as a Loyalist.

BULLERN, Nathaniel -

BULLMAN, John - Immigrated in 1769, was appointed assistant minister by the vestry of St. Michael's Church, Charleston. Purchased a chaplaincy in the British Army.

BURDETT, William - Appears on Colonel John Purves' List of Tory Militia, 1783.

BURKE, Redmund -

BURN, John - "Heirs of" listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class I

BURNSIDE, Alexander - Native of Ireland; immigrated to America in 1765 and settled near Camden, SC. Remained on his land until 1780 but joined the British Army when it came to Camden and evacuated to Charleston with the military.

BURT, William - listed in the Royal Gazette Confiscations List of 20 March 1782 under Class II


CONFISCATION LIST CLASSES:

CLASS I - Comprehends all British subjects who have property in this country, that is to say, such persons as never have submitted to the American Government.

CLASS II - Such of the former inhabitants of this Country, as presented congratulatory addresses to Sir Henry Clinton and Admiral Arbuthnot

CLASS III - Those who petitioned to be armed in defence of the British Government, after the conquest of this Province

CLASS IV - Those who congratulated Earl Cornwallis, on the victory gained at Camden

CLASS V - Those who have borne commissions, civil or military, under the British Government, since the conquest of this Province

CLASS VI - Obnoxious Persons

Source Notes:

1. Confiscated estates lists, published in the Royal Gazette newspaper at Charleston, 20 March 1782.

2. Sabine, Lorenzo. Biographical sketches of Loyalists of the American Revolution. (2nd Ed., 1864)

3. Records of the Loyalist Claims Commission, PRO, London

4. Miscellaneous Papers on Forfeited Estates, File Number S126170, Box 4, SCDAH, Columbia.
Record group includes returns filed by Tory militia commanders filed in 1783, as a result of Ordinance No. 1189, passed by the South Carolina Fifth General Assembly 17 March 1783.

Graphics and background property of Victoria Proctor

Graphics by Victoria

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